vitreous humor


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Related to vitreous humor: vitreous detachment

humor

 [hu´mor] (pl. humors, humo´res) (L.)
1. any fluid or semifluid in the body, adj., adj hu´moral.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating the patient to perceive, appreciate, and express what is funny, amusing, or ludicrous in order to establish relationships, relieve tension, release anger, facilitate learning, or cope with painful feelings.
aqueous humor the fluid produced in the eye and filling the spaces (anterior chamber and posterior chamber) in front of the lens and its attachments. It diffuses out of the eye into the blood and is regarded as the lymph of the eye, although its composition is different from that of the lymph in the rest of the body.
ocular humor either of the humors of the eye—aqueous or vitreous.
vitreous humor the fluid portion of the vitreous body; often used to designate the entire vitreous body.

vit·re·ous hu·mor

[TA]
the fluid component of the vitreous body, with which it is often erroneously equated.
Synonym(s): humor vitreus [TA]

vitreous humor

n.
The clear gelatinous substance that fills the eyeball between the retina and the lens.

vitreous humor

a transparent, semigelatinous substance contained in a thin hyoid membrane and filling the cavity behind the crystalline lens of the eye. Some indications of the hyaloid canal may persist in the vitreous humor, which is not penetrated by any blood vessels and is nourished at its periphery by vessels of the retina and the ciliary processes. The vitreous humor is concave anteriorly to accommodate the crystalline lens and is closely applied to the retina around the wall of the eyeball. Also called corpus vitreum, vitreous body.

vit·re·ous hu·mor

(vit'rē-ŭs hyū'mŏr) [TA]
The fluid component of the vitreous body. usage note Often erroneously equated with the vitreous body.

Vitreous humor

The clear gel-like substance that fills the eyeball behind the lens.
Mentioned in: Uveitis

humor

pl. humores, humors [L.] any fluid or semifluid in the body.

aqueous humor
see aqueous humor.
ocular humor
either of the humors of the eye—aqueous or vitreous.
vitreous humor
see vitreous humor.

vitreous

1. glasslike or hyaline.
2. the vitreous body.

vitreous body
see vitreous body.
vitreous flare
an opacity of the vitreous which occurs with uveitis.
vitreous floater
a small opacity in the vitreous which may stimulate the retina and cause abnormal behavior patterns such as 'fly-biting'.
vitreous humor
1. vitreous body.
2. the watery substance contained within the interstices of the stroma in the vitreous body.
peripapillary vitreous
that adjacent to the optic disk.
persistent hyperplastic vitreous
a congenital anomaly, usually unilateral, due to persistence of embryonic remnants of the fibromuscular tunic of the eye and part of the hyaloid vascular system. Clinically, there is a white pupil, elongated ciliary processes, and often microphthalmia; the lens, although clear initially, may become completely opaque.
vitreous membrane
1. Descemet's membrane.
2. hyaline membrane (1).
3. Bruch's membrane.
4. a delicate boundary layer investing the vitreous body.
primary vitreous
the first stage in development of the vitreous; it persists in the adult as Cloquet's canal.
vitreous removal
vitrectomy.
secondary vitreous
the secondary stage in development of the vitreous; an avascular mass secreted by the retinal ectoderm.
tertiary vitreous
the third and final stage of development of the vitreous; it is secreted by the ciliary epithelium and persists in the adult as the suspensory ligament of the lens.
vitreous veils
curtain-like opacities seen in a normal vitreous.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vitreous humor and a swab of the leptomeninges collected at autopsy were sent to Wadsworth Center.
At Wadsworth Center, testing of the vitreous humor by real-time PCR showed N.
Flashes disappear as soon as the piece of vitreous humor completely separates from the retina.
Our eyes shrink as we age from a loss of HA--a nutrient that keeps water in the vitreous humor.
Exploring the alternative use of the vitreous humor for methylenedioxyamphetamine detection does not necessitate stereoselective data unless perhaps in a final stage when the usefulness of vitreous humor is firmly established but pharmacokinetic fine-tuning is needed.
A whole book (2) has been written covering various parameters--such as livor mortis (the pooling of the blood in the dependent portions of the body after death), rigor mortis (stiffening of the body), the temperature of the body when found, potassium levels in the vitreous humor (the eye fluid) and a whole host of other factors--none of which give hard-and-fast rules for determining the time since death.
Unfortunately, the biochemical analysis of vitreous humor is not always straightforward, and several authors have reported problems with the reproducibility and accuracy of these measurements.
Previously, ISTA was granted Patent Number 5,866,120 in July 1999 and Patent Number 6,039,943 in March of 2000, both covering methods for clearing blood from the vitreous humor using hyaluronidase.
During a vitrectomy, a patient's vitreous humor is surgically removed.
HA is a safe and non-toxic agent currently approved for various medical applications, including the treatment of arthritis, prevention of surgical adhesions and as a vitreous humor substitute following ophthalmic surgical procedures.
HA provides structure and elasticity in synovial fluid in joints, in the vitreous humor of the eye and in umbilical cords.
This laser wavelength is absorbed by the vitreous humor (liquid area) of the eye causing no eye damage as with other types of currently fielded rangefinders.