vitreous

(redirected from vitreous floater)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

vitreous

 [vit´re-us]
1. glasslike or hyaline.
2. the vitreous body.
persistent hyperplastic vitreous a congenital anomaly, usually unilateral, due to persistence of embryonic remnants of the fibromuscular tunic of the eye and part of the hyaloid vascular system. Clinically, there is a white pupil, elongated ciliary processes, and often microphthalmia; the lens, although clear initially, may become completely opaque.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vit·re·ous

(vit'rē-ŭs),
1. Glassy; resembling glass.
2. Synonym(s): vitreous body
[L. vitreus, glassy, fr. vitrum, glass]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vitreous

(vĭt′rē-əs)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, resembling, or having the nature of glass; glassy.
2. Obtained or made from glass.
3. Of or relating to the vitreous humor.
n.
The vitreous humor.

vit′re·os′i·ty (-ŏs′ĭ-tē), vit′re·ous·ness (-əs-nĭs) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

vitreous

adjective Hyalinoid, glass-like.
 
noun
(1) Vitreous body; corpus vitreum [NA6].
(2) Vitreous humour; humour vitreus [NA6].
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

vit·re·ous

(vit'rē-ŭs)
1. Glassy; resembling glass.
2. Synonym(s): vitreous body.
[L. vitreus, glassy, fr. vitrum, glass]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Vitreous

The transparent gel that fills the back part of the eye.
Mentioned in: Retinoblastoma
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 4: Comparison of characteristics of vitreous floater symptoms according to the degree of discomfort.
Vitreous floaters are visual phenomena caused by degenerative changes of the vitreous gel.
Although symptomatic vitreous floaters might be associated with retinal breaks or serious retinal detachment, especially when floaters increase suddenly and possibly accompanied by light flashes [4], it is usually thought to be harmless and natural aging process, and clinicians usually pay little attention to patients' discomfort.
The study group consisted of patients with symptomatic vitreous floaters who primarily visited Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital Retina Clinic to evaluate their floater symptoms and who agreed to participate in the study.
The Vitreous Floaters Symptom Questionnaire and psychological evaluation were done before ophthalmologic examinations.
We compared OCT-based PVD status, psychological parameters, and other clinical factors between patients with symptomatic vitreous floaters and controls.
Endophthalmitis after vitrectomy for vitreous floaters is reported sporadically.
In summary, the 27-gauge vitrectomy was effective and safe for symptomatic vitreous floaters. However, it should be noted that since more healthy young people with excellent vision are trying, even eager to resolve their floaters through seemingly straightforward PPV, potential complications such as cataract, retinal detachment, and even devastating endophthalmitis should be explicitly addressed before this treatment.
North, "Prevalence of vitreous floaters in a community sample of smartphone users," International Journal of Ophthalmology, vol.
Mason 4th et al., "Safety, efficacy, and quality of life following sutureless vitrectomy for symptomatic vitreous floaters," Retina, vol.
Sommerville, "Vitrectomy for vitreous floaters: analysis of the benefits and risks," Current Opinion in Ophthalmology, vol.
Moonasar, "Endophthalmitis following 27-gauge pars pana vitrectomy for vitreous floaters," Case Reports in Ophthalmology, vol.