vitreous detachment

vit·re·ous de·tach·ment

separation of the peripheral vitreous humor from the retina.

vit·re·ous de·tach·ment

(vit'rē-ŭs dĕ-tach'mĕnt)
Separation of the peripheral vitreous humor from the retina.

vitreous detachment

Separation of the rear part of the VITREOUS BODY from the retina as a result of the natural shrinkage that occurs in the elderly. Perception of flahes, floating specks or moving clouds may be a conspicuous, but often temporary, feature of the process.

vitreous detachment 

Separation of the vitreous body from the internal limiting membrane of the retina due to shrinkage from degenerative or inflammatory conditions, trauma, progressive myopia, old age, diabetes and in aphakic eyes in which the lens extraction was intracapsular. The most common cases are elderly individuals in whom the posterior part of the vitreous, which becomes liquid, detaches from the internal limiting membrane (called posterior vitreous detachment, PVD). Symptoms are flashes, floaters and photopsia because as the eye moves the vitreous body comes into contact with the retina. The condition is sometimes associated with retinal tears and retinal detachment. See retinal break; syneresis.
References in periodicals archive ?
logMAR: logarithm of minimal angle of resolution; PHQ-9: Patient Health Questionnaire-9; PSS: Perceived Stress Scale; PVD: posterior vitreous detachment; SEQ: spherical equivalent; STAI: State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.
In idiopathic ERMs, it is probable that the development of a spontaneous posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) causes micro-trauma at the retinal surface particularly at points that generally have a stronger vitreoretinal adhesion such as the vitreofoveal interface and optic disc; this allows Muller cells to migrate through the microscopic breaks onto the retinal surface and contribute to the development of an ERM.
(7) The MH either may form when posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) occurs or may be due to the dehiscence of chronic cystoid macular edema in a long-standing RRD.
Mechanisms responsible for retinal break formation in closed globe injury may be as follows: vitreous base avulsion, abnormal sites of vitreoretinal adhesion (e.g., lattice degeneration), coup injury, contrecoup injury at a location opposite to the site of impact, or sudden posterior vitreous detachment induction [15].
Table 1 shows the conditions considered to be inappropriate for urgent referral to the eye department; of these the most commonly identified condition inappropriately referred urgently was posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) with no sign of retinal hole/tear/break and a negative Shaffer's sign.
reported that using 25-gauge vitrectomy instruments and not inducing posterior vitreous detachment can be uniformly safe for systemic vitreous floaters, since apparently lower incidence (none) of retinal tear or infection was observed.
Figure 3 Diagnosis following presenting complaint of flashers and floaters Uncomplicated posterior vitreous detachment 57% Retinal tear/hole 7% Vitreous haemorrage 9% Migraine 3% No abnormality detected 7% Other 17% Note: Table made from bar graph.
A second analogous retrospective chart review was also performed to establish a control group consisting of patients presenting with an uneventful, "normal," unilateral posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and an attached vitreous in the contralateral eye.
Additionally, posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) can act as a protecting factor in cases with endogenous endophthalmitis.
The prevalence of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) increases with age, as the vitreous liquefies.
Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) was induced very carefully by the cutter probe using aspiration.
Such haemorrhages have a crescent shape which demarcates the limit of the posterior vitreous detachment. The aetiology is commonly neovascularisation or complicated posterior vitreous detachment.