vitiation


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vit·i·a·tion

(vish-ē-ā'shŭn),
A change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]

vitiation

A near-extinct term for the debilitation, deterioration or weakening of a process or condition.

vit·i·a·tion

(vish'ē-ā'shŭn)
A change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]

vit·i·a·tion

(vish'ē-ā'shŭn)
Change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, if the Court's holding rests on the notion that intent cannot be negated by anger, however intense, there ought to have been a proper empirical foundation to support that conclusion, especially since the courts, including the Supreme Court in Robinson, have long since worked on the assumption that intent is capable of vitiation in this manner.
42) In The Borderers, Wordsworth takes advantage of the early debate, without yet reaching the formulation attained by Coleridge, perhaps because for him it is precisely the vitiation of the will by compromised belief which suspends the debate.
This must be interpreted to mean that scientists, by and large, tend to explore natural phenomena by avoiding the vitiation of their pursuit by commercial motivation, self-interest or ambition, although this would appear to be an idealized version.
Americans United has come into existence to defend this open forum of religious liberty against its vitiation by law or the administration of law.
Timms: Reinforcement or Vitiation of the "New Value Exception" to Chapter 11's Absolute Priority Rule?
Nevertheless, the Court was equally clear in explaining that this unfair advantage fails to justify the vitiation of a defendant's constitutional rights to confront all testimony offered against him.
The same high style that had previously been predicated on tulle, feathers shaved and dyed, artificial flowers, and lace (haute tattoo, after all, when laid over bare skin) returned to the image of fashion, minus the vitiation of `80s-style conspicuous consumption.
Note that vitiation, as discussed in this paper, does not relate to concentrations of pollutants.
If we assume that "representative of average system return air" means "having the same vitiation as average system return air," then [E.
Assume the flow rates and zone vitiation percentages as shown in Figure 2.
The AU should also consider suspending Sudan's membership, in accordance with its Constitutive Act (Article 4H), which obliges the regional body to act when a Member State commits gross vitiations of human rights.
In her analysis of Homer's epic and its relevance to the permanent conditions of history, Weil is quick to point out that even those who inflict violence, or stand ready and able to inflict it, suffer the vitiations of force, for it "is as pitiless to the man who possesses it, or thinks he does, as it is to its victims.