vitiation


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vit·i·a·tion

(vish-ē-ā'shŭn),
A change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]

vitiation

A near-extinct term for the debilitation, deterioration or weakening of a process or condition.

vit·i·a·tion

(vish'ē-ā'shŭn)
A change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]

vit·i·a·tion

(vish'ē-ā'shŭn)
Change that impairs use or reduces efficiency.
[L. vitiatio fr. vitio, pp. vitiatus, to corrupt, fr. vitium, vice]
References in periodicals archive ?
Such vitiation of intention will only arise in certain exceptional cases.
Moreover, it could be argued that lack of consent at the time should be distinguished from later vitiation of consent; see R vMabior, Ottawa 33976 (SCC) (Factum of the Criminal Lawyers' Association of Ontario at 7-9).
Measurement and analysis of vitiation of secondary air in air distribution systems (RP-1276).
Duress in the civil law has been among the "vitiating factors long recognized by the common law," (34) however, the scope of the vitiation has been changing for centuries.
As Veena Kukreja observes: "In Pakistan, the vitiation of the electoral process led to the continuous narrowing and increasing unrepresentativeness and unresponsiveness of a self-perpetuating political elite that so irretrievably discredited the parliamentary structure and process that it got brushed aside by the military elite by a decade after its birth."69
Substrate selection and seasonal vitiation in densities of invertebrates in stream pools of a tropical river.
Potts (eds), African Urban Economies: viability, vitality or vitiation? Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
The greatest of these crimes, for Nietzsche and for Pirandello, is the vitiation of the will through the tyranny of custom, tradition, and conformity that negates and erodes the multiplicity of self, drives everyman into unwitting self-exile, and condemns the man of wisdom to "the madness of knowing one can never be oneself" (act 2).
The effects of pollution and vitiation unleashed against the ISI are now discernible in a section of our media.
happens next: vitiation of assent does not necessarily lead to excuse or
Whereas The Woodlanders charts the vitiation of faith in pantheistic perceptions, The Crystal Cabinet applauds the cultural claims, imperatives and aspirations of Wordsworthian poetics to gauge the interwoven dilemmas of the modern self.
One of the requisite elements to sustaining assault or murder convictions in the context of HIV transmission is the vitiation of consent on the part of the complainant through inadequate information.