vitamin K-dependent proteins

vitamin K-dependent proteins

A group of coagulation factor proenzymes–factors II, VII, IX and X produced in the liver, which contain multiple residues of γ-carboxyglutamic acid, an amino acid produced by the post-translational action of a vitamin K-dependent γ-carboxylase on certain glutamyl residues.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Skeletal functions of vitamin K-dependent proteins: not just for clotting anymore.
Vitamin [K.sub.1] is principally transported to the liver, regulating the production of coagulation factors, while vitamin [K.sub.2] is transported to extrahepatic tissues, such as bone and the vascular wall, regulating the activity of matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteocalcin (bone Gla protein)--the main vitamin K-dependent proteins. They require vitamin K for carboxylation in order to function properly.
Vitamin K-dependent proteins, requiring carboxylation to become biologically active, contribute to thrombus formation, vascular calcification, vascular stiffness, and ischemic cardiovascular events [11, 83].
Vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDPs), which require post-translational modification to achieve biological activity, seem to contribute to thrombus formation, vascular calcification, and vessel stiffness.
In a seminal research paper generated by the Rotterdam Study, scientists and doctors determined that increased consumption of Vitamin K2 is correlated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (7), building upon numerous studies describing the inhibitory effect of Vitamin K-dependent proteins on atherosclerosis.
However, scientists have since learned that you can have enough vitamin K to promote healthy blood clotting, yet still not have enough vitamin K for it to activate the Gla-proteins necessary to help prevent cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, and cancer, all conditions in which vitamin K-dependent proteins are known to be factors.
Other vitamin K-dependent proteins inhibited by warfarin include proteins C and S, which are involved in the fibrinolytic system.
of Wisconsin, emeritus) describes the vitamin K-dependent carboxylase, the vitamin K-eposide reductase, a closely associated enzyme, and the identification and function other vitamin K-dependent proteins. He also reviews the current understanding about active forms of vitamin K, food sources, population intake, the impact of diet on the circulating levels of vitamin K, and potential markers for assessing vitamin K status.
Phylloquinone acts as a cofactor for a specific microsomal enzyme, carboxylase, which catalyzes the posttranslational carboxylation of glutamic acid (Glu) to [gamma]-carboxy glutamic acid (Gla) in vitamin K-dependent proteins (9,10).
Newly discovered vitamin K-dependent proteins, such as matrix gla protein, or MGP, are providing clues as to the mechanisms behind these associations.
Detection of vitamin K-dependent proteins in venoms with a monoclonal antibody specific for [beta]-carboxyglutamic acid.