vitamin K-dependent clotting factor

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vitamin K-dependent clotting factor

Any of a group of coagulation factor proenzymes (factors II, VII, IX and X) produced in the liver that contain multiple residues of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid, an amino acid produced by the post-translational action of a vitamin K-dependent gamma-carboxylase on certain glutamyl residues.
 
Four other proteins have gamma-carboxyglutamic acid, and have been designated proteins C, S, Z and M; while M is poorly characterised, proteins C, S and Z have amino-terminal homology with prothrombin. Vitamin K-dependent clotting factors also have another unusual amino acid, aspartic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1978, the first vitamin K-dependent protein relating to skeletal metabolism was discovered and the significance of vitamin K in bone metabolism became public at the end of the 1990s.
So do knockout mice lacking a vitamin K-dependent protein.
The most potent inhibitor of vascular calcification known is matrix GLA protein (MGP), a vitamin K-dependent protein - meaning vitamin K is required to activate this important protein.
In fact, mice that did not have the less-essential vitamin K-dependent protein Mgp (matrix Gla protein) developed arterial and other calcifications and were dead by two months.
In fact, MGP is classified as a vitamin K-dependent protein because it cannot shield against calcification without adequate vitamin K.
Researchers screened children for markers of bone health, including osteocalcin, the vitamin K-dependent protein necessary to use calcium to build healthy bones.
Protein S (PS), [1] a vitamin K-dependent protein, has an important role in the natural coagulation system, as shown by the occurrence of severe thrombotic complications in neonates with homozygous PS deficiency (1,2).
Osteocalcin (OC), a vitamin K-dependent protein expressed by osteoblasts, contains 3 gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues derived from the vitamin K-dependent posttranslational modification of glutamic acid residues.
The physiology of vitamin K nutriture and vitamin K-dependent protein function in atherosclerosis.
Vitamin K-dependent proteins in the developing and aging nervous system.
Vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDPs), which require post-translational modification to achieve biological activity, seem to contribute to thrombus formation, vascular calcification, and vessel stiffness.