vitamin K


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to vitamin K: vitamin E, vitamin D, Vitamin K Deficiency

vi·ta·min K

generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork, liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils, essential for the formation of normal amounts of prothrombin.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vitamin K

n.
A fat-soluble vitamin, occurring in leafy green vegetables, tomatoes, and egg yolks, that promotes blood clotting and prevents hemorrhaging. It exists in several related forms, such as K1 and K2.

vitamin K1

n.
A yellow viscous oil, C31H46O2, found in leafy green vegetables or made synthetically, used by the body in the synthesis of prothrombin and in veterinary medicine as an antidote to certain poisons. Also called phylloquinone.

vitamin K2

n.
A crystalline compound, C41H56O2, isolated from putrefied fish meal or from various intestinal bacteria, used to stop hemorrhaging and in veterinary medicine as an antidote to certain poisons. Also called menaquinone.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

vitamin K

A general term for the structurally similar fat-soluble vitamins (K1, K2, K3) required for the hepatic synthesis of prothrombin; coagulant factors VII, IX and X; and 2-methyl-1,4 naphthoquinone and its derivatives, which have antihaemorrhagic activity.

Dietary sources
Cheese, green tea, leafy greens, liver, oats, egg yolks.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

vi·ta·min K

(vī'tă-min)
Generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils, essential for the formation of normal amounts of prothrombin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

vitamin K

or

phylloquinone

a fat-soluble molecule found in spinach, cabbage, kale and pig's liver. The vitamin is essential in the synthesis of prothrombin used in BLOOD CLOTTING. A deficiency causes an increase in clotting time.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

vi·ta·min K

(vī'tă-min)
Generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork, liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Using participant data from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study (Health ABC), the study found that older adults with low levels of circulating vitamin K were more likely to develop mobility limitation and disability.
In several studies conducted over a decade, vitamin K was found to increase bone mineral density in osteoporotic people and also reduce fracture rates.
Vitamin K, on the other hand, is essential for keeping calcium out of your arteries.
These include resyeratrol, quercetin, grape seed extract, omega 3s, astragalus, vitamin D, solenium, curcumin, saikosaponin, N-acetylcysteine, rosmarinic acid, Pycnogenol, strontium, astaxanthin, vitamin K, vitamin E and many others.
Others appear to be produced by bacteria that live in your intestinal tract, says Sarah Booth, Ph.D., director of the Vitamin K Laboratory at Tufts' Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging in Boston.
Its attraction to calcium helps vitamin K form strong bones.
Studies examining vitamin K supplementation have also shown promising results for increasing bone mineral density.
Each Viactiv Soft Calcium Chew, for example, supplies not only 500 milligrams of calcium, but 40 micrograms (half a day's worth) of vitamin K.
Phylloquinone, the most common form of vitamin K, was the researchers' benchmark for vitamin K intake.
A number of the elderly are taking warfarin, a commonly prescribed anticoagulant that competitively inhibits vitamin K. Are these individuals at greater risk for osteoporosis?
"Since vitamin K lies at the heart of blood coagulation, which heals injuries but also causes heart attacks and strokes," Dowd says, "the key question is: How can someone preserve the blood's injury-healing abilities yet stop unwanted internal clots?
In 2007, an animal study demonstrated significant reduction of arterial calcification in response to vitamin K supplementation.