vitamin D intoxication

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vitamin D intoxication

A condition that occurs in those who either self-prescribe megadoses of vitamin D or consume excess dairy products.

Clinical findings
Anorexia, headaches, muscle weakness, nausea, thirst, organ damage (heart, liver, kidney due to calcium deposition); infants given excess vitamin D may develop atheromas, mental retardation, facial dysmorphia, kidney damage, infections, suffer failure to thrive, or die.

vitamin D intoxication

Hypervitaminosis D, vitamin D toxicity Metabolism A condition that follows megadoses of vitamin D, or excess dairy product consumption Clinical Anorexia, headaches, muscle weakness, nausea, thirst, organ damage–heart, liver, kidney due to calcium deposition; infants given excess vitamin D may develop ASHD, mental retardation, facial dysmorphia, kidney damage, infections, FTT, death. See Vitamin D.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the levels do continue to rise, vitamin D toxicity could develop after many years of supplementation with doses that are known to be safe in the short term.
What is vitamin D toxicity, and should I worry about it since I take supplements?
Because of this wide therapeutic index, vitamin D toxicity is extremely rare, but does occur at excessively high doses.
Advocates argue that the risk of vitamin D toxicity, and potential harm, with supplemental doses of less than 2,000 IU daily, or sometimes more, is very low.
Vitamin D toxicity takes weeks to months to resolve once it develops, and increases the risk of hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, renal insufficiency, nephrocalcinosis, or kidney stones.
While treating and preventing vitamin D deficiency, these large doses of vitamin D2 do not lead to vitamin D toxicity," he added.
Patients with mild to moderate renal failure or chronic granulomatous diseases, such as sarcoidosis, are at higher risk of developing vitamin D toxicity.
The low end of the reference range is set too low due to previous misinterpretations of the research resulting in an overestimation of vitamin D toxicity and an underappreciation of the benefits and safety of higher vitamin D levels.
Research published since 1997 suggests that vitamin D toxicity is very unlikely in healthy individuals at intake levels lower than 10,000 IU/day.
Vitamin D toxicity symptoms include nausea, vomiting, pain in the joints, loss of appetite and muscular weakness.
Some of the symptoms of vitamin A and vitamin D toxicity mimic symptoms normally found in preterm infants.
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