vitamin A toxicity

vitamin A poisoning

A potentially fatal condition evoked by an acute or chronic excess of vitamin A (> 20,000 IU) for more than two weeks.

Clinical findings
Bone pain, dry skin, gastrointestinal complaints (nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhoea), increased intracranial pressure, poor growth in children; affected infants may develop bulging fontanelles, craniotabes (softening of skull bones), pseudotumour cerebri, papilledema, drowsiness, severe headaches, insomnia, jaundice, menstrual disorders, stress, weight loss, irritability, decreased appetite, pruritis, hair loss, seborrhoea, and cracking at corners of mouth.

vitamin A toxicity

Hypervitaminosis A, vitamin A intoxication Nutrition A potentially fatal condition evoked by an acute or chronic excess of vitamin A Clinical Bone pain, dry skin, GI complaints–N&V, constipation, diarrhea; ↑ intracranial pressure, poor growth in children, affected infants may develop bulging fontanelles, craniotabes–softening of skull bones, pseudotumor cerebri, papilledema, drowsiness, severe headaches, insomnia, jaundice, menstrual disorders, stress, weight loss, as well as irritability, ↓ appetite, pruritus, hair loss, seborrhea, cracking at corners of mouth. See Vitamin A.
References in periodicals archive ?
The symptoms of vitamin A toxicity include vomiting, irritability, bulging anterior fontanelles, headache, pseudotumor cerebri, dry skin, abdominal pain, myalgias, emotional instability, insomnia, arthralgias, cortical thickening of hands and feet, and hepatosplenomegaly.
In your case, it sounds like your doctor may be concerned about Vitamin A toxicity, which results from ingesting ten times the recommended daily allowance of 900 micrograms.
Although hypervitaminosis A can occur when very large amounts of liver are regularly consumed, most cases of vitamin A toxicity result from an excess intake of vitamin A in supplements.
Vitamin A toxicity also can cause severe birth defects.
Excess Vitamin A can lead to hypervitaminosis A or Vitamin A toxicity.
Vitamin A toxicity can lead to abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, papilledema, and bulging fontanelle.
Excess beta-carotene does not produce vitamin A toxicity, because no more of it is converted to vitamin A than the body requires.
Two other experiments are using beta-carotene-rich red palm oil as a possible preventive, in an attempt to avoid vitamin A toxicity.
Symptoms of vitamin A toxicity in infants may occur within a few weeks during the supplement of 20 000-60 000 IU/day.
180,000 IU of vitamin A was used to combat MTX side effects without causing secondary vitamin A toxicity side effects (such as skin or vision changes).
As for vitamin A toxicity, it can occur with long-term consumption of 20 mg of retinol or more per day.
Generally, it's been assumed that the body has built-in safeguards to avoid vitamin A toxicity.