vital tooth

vi·tal tooth

a tooth with a living pulp.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vi·tal tooth

(vītăl tūth)
Tooth with a living pulp.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The practice of bleaching is spreading extensively with the hike in demand for aesthetic dentistry.11 Hence, in all probability, an orthodontist who faces patients who may have undergone vital tooth bleaching means that it is essential for them to assess whether bleaching has had any effect on the shear bond strength of orthodontic bracket adhesives on the tooth surface.
The first stage is that of a noncalcified matrix, which can be characterized by the formation of a circular radiolucent area in the region of the apex of a vital tooth. The second or cementoblastic stage is a stage in which a radiopaque material develops from the center to the peripheral region of the lesion.
Thermographic recordings within a few minutes (particularly within the first 20-30 s) after application of thermal stress, and the subsequent thermal recovery, are able to distinguish between a tooth with a pulp temperature equivalent to that of a vital tooth and a tooth with a pulp temperature equivalent to that of a tooth with necrotic pulp chamber.
Hahn, "Three-month evaluation of vital tooth bleaching using light units--a randomized clinical study," Operative Dentistry, vol.
Inclusion criteria: Systemically healthy individuals with dentinal hypersensitivity to air stimulus from 10 mm distance in at least one vital tooth from two quadrants following periodontal therapy.
Peroxide-containing vital tooth whiteners are classified into three categories, according to application mode and peroxide concentration.
(1) Vital tooth bleaching is a widespread procedure for which several techniques and materials have been developed (2) (e.g., in-office or power bleaching, dentist-controlled home bleaching, and market bleaching products).
The most common swellings were inflammatory which accounted for 138 (39.42%) cases; the most frequent cause was found to be caries and non vital tooth. Cystic swellings were found in 111 (37.71%) cases and neoplastic swellings in 79 (22.57%) cases followed by miscellaneous swelling in 22 (6.28%) cases (Table).
Shillingburg (1) states that any vital tooth that is being relined should be done so via the indirect method because of this exothermic heat increase.