vital pulp


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

vi·tal pulp

a pulp composed of viable tissue, either normal or diseased, that responds to electric stimuli and to heat and cold.

vit·al pulp

(vī'tăl pŭlp)
A pulp composed of viable tissue, either normal or diseased, that responds to electric stimuli and to heat and cold.

vital pulp

Dental pulp that is alive and healthy.
See also: pulp

vit·al pulp

(vī'tăl pŭlp)
Pulp composed of viable tissue, either normal or diseased, responds to electric stimuli and to heat and cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dentin regeneration in vital pulp therapy: design principles.
Vital pulp therapy is the treatment of the tooth pulp with the intention of keeping it alive, as opposed to a root canal in which the pulp is removed from the tooth.
Ferric sulfate (FS) has been commonly used as a pulpotomy agent to control pulpal bleeding in vital pulp therapy for 30 years.
Vital pulp therapy is a treatment option intended to preserve the pulp when previously exposed by trauma or decay.
The use of calcium silicate-based cements in vital pulp therapy causes concern regarding the color alteration of the cement and consequent dentin discoloration.
Vital pulp therapy in cariously exposed permanent teeth and its limitations.
Vital Pulp Therapies in Clinical Practice: Findings from a Survey with Dentist in Southern Brazil.
Caries control and other variables associated with success of primary molar vital pulp therapy.
This survey concentrated on vital pulp therapy and was simply a pilot survey, part of a larger study which plans to survey primary pulp therapy methods taught in dental schools in all of Europe.
1-3 Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH) has been regarded as a preference material in situations where vital pulp therapy is indicated.
These studies used zinc oxide-eugenol or polycarboxylate cement over the amputated pulps, possibly confounding tissue changes as a previous histological study showed zinc oxide-eugenol directly contacting vital pulp caused persistent inflammation and internal resorption [Berger, 1965].
They were of the opinion that one visit root canal therapy should be reserved for vital pulp and immediate peri-radicular surgery cases only.