visuoauditory

visuoauditory

 [vizh″u-o-aw´dĭ-tor″e]
pertaining to vision and hearing.

vis·u·o·au·di·tor·y

(vizh'yū-ō-aw'di-tōr'ē),
Relating to both vision and hearing; denoting nerves connecting the centers for these senses.

visuoauditory

/vis·uo·au·di·to·ry/ (vizh″dbobr-o-aw´dĭ-tor″e) simultaneously stimulating, or pertaining to simultaneous stimulation of, the senses of both hearing and sight.

vis·u·o·au·di·tor·y

(vizh'yū-ō-aw'di-tōr'ē)
Relating to both vision and hearing; denoting nerves connecting centers for these senses.

visuoauditory

pertaining to sight and hearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Visuoauditory sensory substitution systems (ultrasonic guides, such as the Sonicguide and Trisensor, or Prosthesis Substitution Vision with Audition) essentially allow persons to collect information about the location and distance of objects, whereas visuotactile systems, such as the Tactile Vision Substitution System (TVSS), enable access to more complex optical-like information.
Although visuoauditory systems (Kay, 1974; Kay & Kay, 1983) were used in the 1970s and 1980s (see, for example, Sampaio, 1994), these systems rarely became part of educational training programs for young children who are blind because they had some major disadvantages, such as poor resolution, the interference they produced with different types of auditory stimulation, and their inability to be used with objects or forms with properties other than some elementary ones, such as horizontal and vertical elements or points.
On the contrary, studies on visuoauditory sensory substitutions have shown that infants who are blind have an extraordinary capacity to learn and quickly understand the invariants given by these types of devices (Sampaio, 1989b).