visual vertigo

visual vertigo

vertigo induced by visual stimuli.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vis·u·al ver·ti·go

(vizh'ū-ăl vĕr'ti-gō)
That finding induced by visual stimuli.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Visual vertigo analogue scale: an assessment questionnaire for visual vertigo.
The concept of "visual vertigo" was first described by Erasmus Darwin in 1797 [7].
(4) Multifocal spectacles can impair distance depth perception, contrast sensitivity, and exacerbate visual vertigo. (5,6) Bifocal lenses induce an apparent displacement of objects in the visual field due to prismatic jump at the top of the reading segment, altering both normal perception and increasing the risk of falls.
Bronstein AM, 1995, Visual vertigo syndrome: clinical and posturography findings.
Well established concepts are represented by phobic postural vertigo, space and motion phobia, and visual vertigo [1-3].
He then talked about phobic postural vertigo, visual vertigo, panic and anxiety besides convulsions in detail.
Visual vertigo: symptom assessment, spatial orientation and postural control.
For not only do the mirrors induce visual vertigo, but they carry a psychological metaphor as well: Visual experience and philosophical reason are integrated perfectly; existing objects are hidden from view; and what appears visually does not necessarily exist.
Experiments on visual vertigo conducted at the end of the century are also described.
Not only do readers experience a visual vertigo reading this passage but we are dizzied by the "murmuring tongues" as the passage seems to erupt from itself through sight to sound and movement.
It can be classified among the primary and secondary somatoform dizziness syndromes, which are also termed visual vertigo syndrome (Bronstein, 1995) or chronic subjective dizziness (Staab, Ruckenstein, 2007).