visual threat

visual threat

The sudden presentation of a visual stimulus to a patient, typically a gesture that rapidly approaches the patient's eyes, e.g., the examiner's fast-moving hand. The normal neurological response to a visual threat is to blink the eyelids or flinch.
References in periodicals archive ?
These circuits turned out to be critical in determining how the mice reacted to a visual threat. Turning on the circuit that projected to the BLA caused more freezing responses, while activating the mPFC circuit increased tail shaking responses.
A team of researchers led by Andrew Huberman, Ph.D., professor of neurobiology and of ophthalmology at Stanford University in California, investigated the role of the ventral midline thalamus (vMT) in determining how animals respond to visual threats. The thalamus is a brain region that acts as a relay station, taking in sensory information, such as what is seen and heard, and sorting out where in the brain to send that information.
BAE Systems BAE Systems Showcases Visual Threat Training Simulators at Army Expo.
Crayfish do not appear to represent a chemical or visual threat nor do they appear to elicit a stress response in the sacrificial guppy.
The visual threat recognition and avoidance trainer, called VTRAT, is gaining increasing use in the Air Force special operations community.
Huge offshore sites will obviously be welcomed because they pose no visual threat,but there are drawbacks: Navigation and fishing issues may be greaternWater may be deeper n nWeather and sea rougher Installation will be more difficult and costly Connection costs greater Maintenance more difficult and costlynInvestment and risk greater.
Designated as the NS-9003A-V2/9005A-V2 system, the new suite functions by detecting and identifying (with a 100 percent probability of intercept) over-the-horizon radar signals, generating audio and visual threat alarms and providing an automatic, active countermeasures response.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Researchers identified two adjacent clusters of nerve cells in the brains of mice whose activation levels upon sighting a visual threat spell the difference between a timid response and a bold or even fierce one.
This exercise was the first set of missions to make use of the M-40, which is able to represent a full spectrum of radar, infrared (IR) and visual threats. Because of its lower operating costs, the M-40 was able to provide the same level of training as previous exercises at a significantly reduced cost.
The target drone is unique in that it is designed to provide medium-to-high performance at a price comparable with competitor's entry-level drones, able to convincingly mimic a variety of aircraft and missiles, including radar, infrared (IR) and visual threats.
Able to convincingly mimic a variety of aircraft and missiles, the target drone can simulate radar, infrared (IR) and visual threats. This allows Armed Forces to shoot down the reusable M-40 in realistic scenarios, allowing them to train with and qualify a wide variety of weapon systems.