visual neglect

visual neglect

a condition in wich aspects of visual stimulus are ignored by the subject, due to various cortical abnormalities.

vis·u·al ne·glect

(vizh'ū-ăl nĕ-glekt')
Inattention to visual stimuli or information occurring in the visual field of the involved side of the body.

visual neglect 

A rare phenomenon in which a patient can see all of the visual field binocularly but somehow ignores objects on one side (e.g. patient may draw a diagram omitting one side or shave only one side of the face). It is due to a lesion of the brain (e.g. a stroke), most often in the right cortex and the patient, although conscious of objects in the left visual field does not pay attention to them. The impairment occurs in the posterior parietal lobe, which receives projections from the primary visual cortex. A confrontation visual field test in which objects are presented to both sides simultaneously often facilitates detection of the condition. See extinction phenomenon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, N-CABS was found to be a reliable screening tool to assess six cognitive impairments including Attention, Memory, Naming, Arithmetic, Reasoning and Visual Neglect. It has several advantages over other bedside cognitive tests commonly used to detect PSCI as it is inexpensive, less time consuming and more culturally relevant.
Visuospatial inattention, also termed visual neglect or hemispatial neglect, can occur following right hemisphere stroke [9].
Humphreys, "Neuroanatomical dissections of unilateral visual neglect symptoms: ALE meta-analysis of lesion-symptom mapping," Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, vol.
Damage to several different sites--but usually the parietal lobe--may cause a loss of awareness of one side of space; (35,36) this is known as unilateral visual neglect. Patients may omit half of objects when drawing, or only eat food on one side of a plate.
Prevalence rates for peripheral visual field loss (such as homonymous hemianopia) vary from 14% to 20% (Brahm, Wilgenburg, Kirby, Ingalla, Chang & Goodrich, 2007), while visual neglect has a prevalence rate of 43% (Ringman, 2004).
The second behavioral section comprises nine tests selected by psychologists and occupational therapists and based on specific difficulties faced by patients with visual neglect in everyday life situations, such as picture scanning, phone dialing, menu reading, article reading, telling and setting the time, coin sorting, address and sentence copying, map navigation, and card sorting.
Supervised versus home physiotherapy outcomes in stroke patients with unilateral visual neglect: A randomized controlled follow-up study.
Visual neglect is a common deficit after unilateral brain injury, particularly following strokes centered on the right superior and inferior parietal lobes; however, other influential areas also exist, including the frontal lobes, anterior cingulate cortex, frontal eye fields, basal ganglia, and thalamus (32-38).
All nine patients studied with the detection test had visual neglect in both neuropsychological and visual detection tests.
Spatial cognition: evidence from visual neglect. Trends Cogn Sci 2003;7: 125-33.
A simple method to dissociate sensory-attentional and motor-intentional biases in unilateral visual neglect. Brain and Cognition, 58, 269-273.

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