visual aura

visual aura

epileptic aura characterized by visual illusions or hallucinations, formed or unformed, including scintillations and teichopsia.
See also: aura (1).

vis·u·al au·ra

(vizh'ū-ăl awr'ă)
Epileptic aura characterized by visual illusions or hallucinations, formed or unformed, including scintillations, and teichopsia.
See also: aura (1)

aura, visual 

Visual sensations that precede an epileptic attack or a migraine. These sensations may appear as light flashes, scintillating scotomata, etc.

vis·u·al au·ra

(vizh'ū-ăl awr'ă)
Epileptic aura characterized by visual illusions or hallucinations, formed or unformed.
References in periodicals archive ?
A migraine also has a characteristic headache-pulsating or throbbing, usually one-sided, and generally preceded by a visual aura.
It sounded great on record but was sensational on stage as the impact of the atmospheric lighting created an intense audio visual aura.
Given the fact that women have elevated stroke risk factors such as hypertension, migraine with visual aura, diabetes, depression, atrial fibrillation (a heart disease) one in five women are at risk for stroke compared to one in six men.
8) reported that prednisolone stopped migraine and returned the platelet count to the normal levels in a 31-year-old ITP case, who had concomitant ischemic cerebral infarction and migraine with visual aura.
Case reports have also suggested that ginger may prevent the onset of headache when taken upon the onset of visual aura.
If they are not empathetic, then there may be a possibility of misreading the aura of the other person, either because they cannot read it at all, or because a visual aura is being evoked by a reaction to their own personal feelings towards the person/client.
Women with probable migraine with visual aura (PMVA) have an increased risk for ischemic stroke (odds ratio [OR]=2.
Complicated migraine is often accompanied by classic migraine symptoms, including nausea, photophobia, and visual aura phenomena such as scintillating scotoma or kaleidoscope vision.
A visual aura occurs in the visual cortex area of the brain and can cause sufferers to see zigzagging lines or blurry spots, or to lose parts of their fields of vision.
The difference between a migraine visual aura and an epileptic aura is as follows:
20), (21) The classic visual aura starts as an irregular colored crescent of light with multi-colored edges in the center of the visual field that gradually progresses toward the periphery lasting < 60 minutes.
Migraine variant is characterized by paroxysmal episodes of prolonged visual auras, atypical sensory, motor or visual aura, confusion, dysarthria, focal neurological deficits, gastrointestinal manifestations, or other constitutional symptoms with or without headache (Dafer, 2009).