visual angle

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angle

 [ang´g'l]
the space or figure formed by two diverging lines, measured as the number of degrees one would have to be moved to coincide with the other.
acromial angle that between the head of the humerus and the clavicle.
alpha angle that formed by intersection of the visual axis with the optic axis.
buccal a's
1. the tooth angles between the buccal surface and the other surfaces of a posterior tooth; see accompanying illustration.
2. the cavity angles between the buccal wall of a tooth cavity and other walls.
cardiodiaphragmatic angle that formed by the junction of the shadows of the heart and diaphragm in posteroanterior radiographs of the heart.
cavity a's the angles formed by the junction of two or more walls of a tooth cavity, named according to the walls participating in their formation.
cavosurface angle the angle formed by the junction of a wall of a tooth cavity preparation and a surface of the crown of the tooth.
costovertebral angle the angle formed on either side of the vertebral column between the last rib and the lumbar vertebrae.
distal a's
1. the tooth angles formed between the distal surface and the other surfaces of a tooth; see accompanying illustration.
2. the cavity angles between the distal wall of a tooth cavity and other walls.
filtration angle (angle of the iris) the angle between the iris and cornea at the periphery of the anterior chamber of the eye, through which the aqueous humor readily permeates.
angle of jaw the junction of the lower edge with the posterior edge of the lower jaw.
lingual a's
1. the tooth angles formed between the lingual surface and the other surfaces of a tooth; see accompanying illustration.
2. the cavity angles between the lingual wall of a tooth cavity preparation and other walls.
angle of Louis an anatomical landmark located on the sternum; it can be felt as a notch or ridge at the top of the sternum.
mesial a's
1. the tooth angles formed between the mesial surface and other surfaces of a tooth; see accompanying illustration.
2. the cavity angles between the mesial wall of a tooth cavity and other walls.
meter angle the angle formed by intersection of the visual axis and the perpendicular bisector of the line joining the centers of rotation of the two eyes when viewing a point one meter distant (small meter angle) or the angle formed by intersection of the visual axes of the two eyes in the midline at a distance of one meter (large meter angle).
optic angle visual angle.
angle of pubis that between the pubic bones at the symphysis.
sternoclavicular angle that between the sternum and the clavicle.
tooth a's the angles formed by the junction of two or more surfaces of a tooth, named according to the surfaces participating in their formation
Tooth angles: Top, line angles; Bottom, point angles. From Dorland's, 2000.
(see accompanying illustration).
visual angle the angle between two lines passing from the edges of an object seen, through the nodal point of the eye, to the corresponding edges of the image of the object seen.

vis·u·al an·gle

the angle formed at the retina by the meeting of lines drawn from the periphery of the object seen.

vis·u·al an·gle

(vizh'ū-ăl ang'gĕl)
The angle formed at the retina by the meeting of lines drawn from the periphery of the object seen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Does global precedence really depend on visual angle? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 9(6), 955-965.
This visual angle is realized on the unit sphere [S.sup.2] centered at O.
We call the appearance visual angle. Note that visual angle in this paper is not the angle a viewed object subtends at the eye which is called the object's angular size.
Investigating the visual angle hypothesis we designed a spatial layout of 14 stimuli with different sizes and locations to assess the accuracy in verbal reports of relative distances between stimuli.
For within-subject factor, we considered the visual angle of relative distance as defined by Haber (1985) and Przeorek (1986).
The second approach we used to examine interfacetal constancy involved what we termed the visual angle. This angle is not identical to the interommatidial angle, but it provides an e stimate of the optical "catchment" of each dioptric apparatus on purely geometric grounds.
The authors manipulated viewpoint elevation to distinguish between effects of visual angle and those of ground distance on judgments (p.
Strangely, the commentator pretends that our "analyses of the optic array apparently were limited to two visual angles." That is false.
The vertical and horizontal visual angles of the display components varied greatly depending on the eyepoint elevation.
For example, if a is the visual angle between the target and the horizon, and the observer's eye-height is I, then the distance, d, to the object is given by: d = I/tan [alpha].
Although the fixation point appeared at a random position on the CRT, the peripheral stimuli appeared on a circle that determined the visual angle, as shown in Figure 2.
Depending on their make and type, they provide a limited field of view of approximately 40 degrees of visual angle. Visual acuity can be expected to be approximately 20/30 Snellen acuity at best under optimal lighting conditions.

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