visual analog scale


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visual analog scale

An instrument used to quantify a subjective experience, such as the intensity of pain. A commonly used visual analog scale is a 10-cm line labeled with “worst pain imaginable” on the right border and “no pain” on the left border. The patient is instructed to make a mark along the line to represent the intensity of pain currently being experienced. The clinician records the distance of the mark in centimeters from the left end of the scale.
See also: scale
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, neither group in the first study had a significant change in their visual analog scale pain scores, and age did not correlate statistically with vitamin D level in the second study.
The pattern of pruritus was roughiy similar in all four groups, becoming noticeable within 5 minutes and reaching a peak at 30 minutes in the placebo and highest-dose groups, at about 55 mm and about 25 mm on the visual analog scale, respectively.
After 4 weeks of therapy, visual analog scale pain scores in the test group decreased from 6.
Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), a visual analog scale that produces a score from 0 to 60, with a score of 16 considered a significant level of depressive symptoms.
Dyloject(TM) provided statistically superior pain relief over Voltarol(R) over the initial 2 hours post-dose as measured both on Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (p=0.
Both groups had significant improvement in pain on the first day, as shown with a 100-point visual analog scale, with a greater mean improvement for the methylprednisolone group.
Participants had symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee with global pain intensity of at least 30 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale for at least 24 hours prior to enrollment.
Mean pain scores reported by both groups on the 0-10 visual analog scale were 4 at both 12 hours and 24 hours and 2 at 48 hours.
The IUD group reported significantly less dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and nonmenstrual pain on a visual analog scale and a verbal rating scale after treatment, compared with the control group.
At baseline, the mean Visual Analog Scale of Pain Intensity (VASPI) score, the most commonly used pain assessment scale for clinical trials, for both placebo and PRIALT groups was 80.
Pain scores at the time of placement as measured using a 100-mm visual analog scale were 23.
1-point improvement on a 15-point patient global assessment visual analog scale, compared with a 3.

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