viscous

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viscous

 [vis´kus]
sticky or gummy; having a high degree of viscosity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vis·cous

(vis'kŭs), Do not confuse this adjective with the noun viscus.
Sticky; marked by high viscosity.
[see viscid, viscosity]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vis·cous

(vis'kŭs)
Sticky; marked by high viscosity.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

viscous

Of a liquid substance, thick and sticky so that there is resistance to flow.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(alkanes, naphthenes, alkynes, aromatics, and others), from viscously
The viscously cruel tactic of destroying food crops and slaughtering buffalo led to the starvation and near extinction of many American Indian nations.
Mauduit was arrested and viscously tortured for 17 days before he managed to escape--and soon defected to the French side, later earning a commission upon his graduation from Cherchell Officer School.
"He had the courage to say and do something, the result was that he was viscously and brutally assaulted in what was a prolonged attack where he had no chance to defend himself and through most of it he was unconscious.
Brown took the polymer particles to be entirely solid, deformable only elastically, i.e., reversibly, and not at all viscously; he overlooked any elastoviscous contribution to a particle's resistance to elastic deformation.
Hydraulic fingertip control provides increased maneuverability with minimal hand movements, while a viscously mounted operator compartment reduces noise and vibration levels.
Barolini's style is consistently combative and muscular, full of strong words like "indemnify," "forge," "crucible," "shocking," "egregious," with a marked predilection for privatives, such as "non-narrativity," "non-transcendence," "non-chronology." She is marvellously limpid, contrasting for example Dante's "viscously physical hell" with Vergil's "doubt-ridden elegaic ethos," and sometimes moving, noting that Vergil is "a guide whom he would cause us to love and then to lose." She knows her Dante criticism, Italian and not, recent and archaic.
Warne introduced himself to the England batsmen at Old Trafford with a viscously spinning leg-break that turned at least a yard to knock back Gatting's off-stump.
Lucile Desblache writes warmly but not viscously about the different slant on reality that' owning' animals or reading about them furnishes us humans.
The first act finale, in which the boy mounts his favorite horse in an act of religious ecstasy and sexual release, is almost unbearably intense - more so than the climactic scenes in the second act, when the mortified boy fails at sex with his willing girlfriend and then viscously turns on the watching horses, whose eyes are to him like the eyes of God.