viscosity

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viscosity

 [vis-kos´ĭ-te]
resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē),
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

viscosity

An MRI term for a measure of a fluid’s resistance to deformity by shear or tensile stress, which affects its mobility and therefore its intensity in an image.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

viscosity

The tendency of a fluid to resist flow or the quality of resistance to flow; viscosity is measured with a viscometer to assess hyperviscosity syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathies, rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, hyperfibrinogenemia Ref range 1.4-1.8 relative to water. See Apparent viscosity. Cf Specific gravity.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

viscosity

  1. the property of stickiness by which substances resist change of shape.
  2. a measure of the ease with which layers of fluid pass each other.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
9, the bulk viscosity of polypropylene is smaller than the bulk viscosities of HDPE and LDPE from the study of Aleman [7] at the very low strain rate and it is almost the same at higher strain rate.
However these correlations fail to predict oil viscosities at wide range of operating conditions such as pressure and temperature.
* High accuracy over a wide range of viscosities and flow rates up to 2,000 cST with proper clearances
This correction factor does not depend on the condition that all relative viscosities fall on one curve.
In this region, it was observed that a decrease in viscosity first occurs due to a number of hydrophobic interactions followed by a slight increase in the number of interactions that allow the solution to maintain high viscosities up to 40CC In relation to the time in which these unions interact, it can be seen that time increases with temperature (up to 35[degrees]C), followed by a decrease (40[degrees]C).
Table 3 depicts a wide variety of formulas and viscosities. Another set of formulas based on mild, biodegradable surfactants with rich, creamy lather and soft after feel are listed in Table 4, showing the viscosity building properties of various thickeners.
Pumps for liquid metering/proportioning and systems for in-line blending of two or more liquids, Units handle pressures up to 50,000 psi and viscosities to 100,000 cp at outputs to 23,000 gal/hr.
Zero-shear viscosities were 1.0 X 10[sup.4] and 7.3 x 110[sup.3] Pa-sec, respectively.
It can be seen from this figure that the zero-shear viscosities of the suspensions of a given fibrid type are effectively independent of the suspending medium viscosity and determined only by the morphology and concentration of the fibrids; particle-particle interactions appear to dominate at low shear rates.
This allows the calculation of the constants A and B and subsequent determination of viscosities at other, intermediate temperatures.