viscerogenic

vis·cer·o·gen·ic

(vis'ĕr-ō-jen'ik),
Of visceral origin; denoting a number of sensory and other reflexes.
[viscero- + G. -gen, producing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vis·cer·o·gen·ic

(vis'ĕr-ō-jen'ik)
Of visceral origin; denoting a number of sensory and other reflexes.
[viscero- + G. -gen, producing, + ic]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

viscerogenic

(vĭs″ĕr-ō-jĕn′ĭk) [″ + Gr. gennan, to produce]
Originating in the viscera.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Shneidman also says that psychache results from frustrated psychological needs, with a reference to the psychological needs identified by Murray (1938) and classified in two categories--primary or viscerogenic (based on biological needs) and secondary (of a psychogenic nature).
The Lord is my external internal integrative mechanism, I shall not be deprived of gratification for my viscerogenic hungers or my need dispositions.
In addition to identify the principal human needs, Murray also subdivided them in many ways, distinguishing covert and overt needs, viscerogenic and psychogenic needs, proactive and reactive needs, and focal and diffuse needs (Lindzey and Rieber, 2002).