visceral layer

vis·cer·al lay·er

[TA]
the inner layer of an enveloping sac or bursa that lines the outer surface of the enveloped structure, as opposed to the parietal layer that lines the walls of the occupied space or cavity. The visceral layer is usually thin, delicate, and not apparently separate, but instead seems to be the outer surface of the structure itself.
See also: serosa.
Synonym(s): lamina visceralis [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vis·cer·al lay·er

(vis'ĕr-ăl lā'ĕr) [TA]
The inner layer of an enveloping sac or bursa, which covers the outer surface of the enveloped structure, as opposed to the parietal layer, which lines the walls of the occupied space or cavity. The visceral layer is usually thin, delicate, and not apparent as being separate, but rather appears to be the outer surface of the structure itself.
Synonym(s): lamina visceralis [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) The serous pericardium is further divided into a visceral layer, which covers the heart and great vessels, and a parietal layer, which lines the fibrous pericardium.
The procedure of closing the parietal peritoneum, leaving the visceral one opened is a preferred procedure with several surgeons--taking the benefits of leaving the visceral layer opened such as shortening the procedure time and avoiding bladder suspension and the benefits of closing the parietal peritoneum such as keeping the intestine and omentum in and facilitating the anatomical restoration during abdominal closure.
In his control neck CT, there was fluid collection in anterior cervical visceral layer and right carotid space with air bubbles without mediastinal involvement.
Pneumopericardium occurs if it enters to pericardial reflection where pericardium and visceral layer attaches at Hilum.
The outer layer of the pleural sac, the parietal layer, is served by the systemic circulation; the inner, visceral layer, by the bronchial circulation.
(2,3) The flexor tendons of the hand are surrounded by double layered synovial compartments filled with synovial fluid, the deep layer is the visceral layer and contacts the tendon, the second, more superficial, layer is called the parietal layer.