excretion

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excretion

 [ek-skre´shun]
1. the act, process, or function of excreting. Ordinarily, what is meant by excretion is defecation, the evacuation of feces. Technically, excretion can refer to the expulsion of any matter, whether from a single cell or from the entire body, or to the matter excreted.
2. waste material eliminated from the body, including feces, urine, and sweat. Mucus and carbon dioxide also can be considered excretions. The organs of excretion are the intestinal tract, kidneys, lungs, and skin. Called also excreta. adj., adj ex´cretory.

ex·cre·tion

(eks-krē'shŭn),
1. The process whereby the undigested residue of food and the waste products of metabolism are eliminated, material is removed to regulate the composition of body fluids and tissues, or substances are expelled to perform functions on an exterior surface.
2. The product of a tissue or organ that is material to be passed out of the body. Synonym(s): excreta Compare: secretion.
[see excrement]

excretion

(ĭk-skrē′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of discharging waste matter from the blood, tissues, or organs.
2. The matter, such as urine or sweat, that is so excreted.

excretion

The act or process of eliminating waste products from the body.

excretion

Therapeutics
1. The final elimination of a drug or other compound from the circulation–eg, via the kidneys in urine, biles into stool, saliva, sweat.
2. A product that has been eliminated.

ex·cre·tion

(eks-krē'shŭn)
1. The process whereby the undigested residue of food and the waste products of metabolism are eliminated; material is removed to regulate the composition of body fluids and tissues, or substances are expelled to perform functions on an exterior surface.
2. The product of a tissue or organ that is material to be passed out of the body.
Synonym(s): excreta.
See: excrement
Compare: secretion

excretion

Removal from the body of the waste products of metabolism.

excretion

any elimination from an organism of unwanted materials, for example, carbon dioxide and nitrogenous substances produced in METABOLISM. It is worth noting that excretory materials must be produced by the organism rather than just pass through it; thus faeces in mammals contain a mixture of excreta (e.g. bile pigments) and undigested gut contents. Compare SECRETION.

Patient discussion about excretion

Q. what is the best thing to do to eliminate or to let it be remove without surgery?I'm afraid but laser mayb ok If I can go for laser where can you suggest coz I'm jobless and can't afford to pay.Or is there some remedy that i can take to melt those stones inside my bladder then they can come out through my waste ?

A. Bladder stones, also called bladder calculi, often form when concentrated urine sits in your bladder. Bladder stones usually need to be removed. If the stone is small, your doctor may recommend that you drink an increased amount of water each day to help the stone pass. If the stone is large or doesn't pass on its own, your doctor may need to remove the stone. Bladder stones are usually removed during a procedure called a cystolitholapaxy. This is done by inserting a small tube with a camera at the end (cystoscope) through your urethra and into your bladder to view the stone. Your doctor uses a laser, ultrasound or mechanical device to break the stone into small pieces and then flushes the pieces from your bladder.
I am not familiar with the cost of such procedure.

Q. skins does excrete oil and keratin what exactly is the whitish cape up that you can squeeze out from underskin

A. It sounds like you refer to sebum, an oily substance secreted by (how surprising :) ) sebaceus glands attached to the hair root. It's important for the skin, although abnormal secretion of it may cause diseases such as acne.

You may read more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebum#Sebum

Q. How much influence does diet pose when dealing with fibro? What actions have been found to reduce or eliminate

A. Of course, you may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/fibromyalgia.html

And if you have any questions you may consult your doctor.

More discussions about excretion
References in periodicals archive ?
Virus excretion and mutation by infants following primary vaccination with live oral poliovaccine from two sources.
In contrast, our data indicate that pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus cannot productively infect chickens at the ages of 1 week (air sac inoculation), 12 weeks (contact exposure, intravenous inoculation), or 15 weeks (oculo-oronasal inoculation), or turkeys at the ages of 1 week (air-sac inoculation) and 4 weeks (contact exposure) because neither virus excretion nor seroconversion was observed during the 10-day observation period.
Infection was defined as seroresponse (4-fold rise in titer from preinoculation baseline to 30-day serum sample, as measured by ELISA) or fecal virus excretion as detected by RT-PCR or presence of antigen.
Virus excretion from cloacal swabs was demonstrated from 2 to 6 DPI in the high-dose group (Figure 1, panel C) and 4-10 DPI in the low-dose group (Figure 1, panel D).
For 7 days all calves were monitored by physical examination, and pharyngeal swabs were collected and examined for virus excretion.
Although virus antigen expression was detected in several other tissues, virus originating from these sites likely did not contribute to virus excretion.
Our study shows that of the 6 wild duck species studied, the mallard is the prime candidate for being a long-distance vector of HPAIV (H5N1) because it was the only species to show abundant virus excretion without clinical or pathologic evidence of debilitating disease (Table; Figure 2, panels B and D).
While the median (range) duration of virus excretion in stools and sputa for the entire measurable cohort (n = 56) was 27 (16-127) and 21 (14-52) days, respectively (3), it was 125 and 16 days for patient 1, and 109 and 52 days for patient 3 (viral excretion data could not be obtained from patient 2 because sequential specimens for detection were unavailable).