virulence factors

virulence factors

Factors essential for the pathogenicity of bacteria. In the case of Vibrio cholerae , for instance, the virulence factors are cholera toxin and the toxin coregulated pilus which is necessary for V. cholerae to colonize the intestine. A small molecule has been found that can inhibit the production of both of these factors without affecting the reproduction of the organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maydis virulence will identify a complete arsenal of fungal virulence factors.
It is important to consider the presence or absence of these virulence factors when reading the literature.
thailandensis shares most virulence factors and extensive genomic similarity with B.
Although inhibitory effects of SNPs have been widely studied, the majority of the studies have mainly focused on inhibitory effect of SNPs on growth of bacteria and hence, there is a large gap about antagonistic effects of SNPs on virulence factors of the pathogenic microorganisms.
Beyond the pathogen's own genetic sequence, and the virulence factors it codes for, there are still many other variables.
faecium isolates are characterized by a high frequency of genes encoding putative virulence factors, such as collagen adhesin (acm gene), enterococcal surface protein (esp gene), hyaluronidase (hyl gene), gelatinase (gelE gene), endocarditis antigen (efa gene), and cytolysin (cyl operon) [6].
The pathogenic potential of Malassezia, a known commensal is related to virulence factors, environmental factors, and genetic predisposition of host.
The research was mainly focused on three aspects including bacterial load, histopathological changes and virulence factors.
These pathogens generally evade a normal human immune response via immunosuppression and other virulence factors.