virulence


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Related to virulence: toxigenicity

virulence

 [vir´u-lens]
the degree of pathogenicity of a microorganism as indicated by case fatality rates and/or its ability to invade the tissues of the host; the competence of any infectious agent to produce pathologic effects. adj., adj vir´ulent.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vir·u·lence

(vir'yū-lĕns),
The disease-evoking severity of a pathogen; numerically expressed as the ratio of the number of cases of overt infection to the total number infected, as determined by immunoassay.
[L. virulentia, fr. virulentus, poisonous]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

virulence

Epidemiology The proportion of persons with clinical disease, who after infection, become severely ill or die. See Neurovirulence.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

vir·u·lence

(vir'yū-lĕns)
The disease-evoking power of a pathogen; numerically expressed as the ratio of the number of cases of overt infection to the total number infected, as determined by immunoassay.
[L. virulentia, fr. virulentus, poisonous]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

virulence

The capacity of any infective organism to cause disease and to injure or kill a susceptible host.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

virulence

the collective properties of an organism that render it pathogenic to another one, the host.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

vir·u·lence

(vir'yū-lĕns)
The disease-evoking power of a pathogen.
[L. virulentia, fr. virulentus, poisonous]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The biofilm formation is an important virulence factor, which is associated with refractoriness towards treatment.
In North East India, fungal disease incidences are high; our previous study from Tripura showed VVC rates at 25% and as one of the most common finding among STIs.[sup][6] Studies from India on virulence factors expressed by Candida species isolated from VVC subjects are few,[sup][7] therefore this study was taken up with the aim to find out whether the isolated Candida spp.
monocytogenes isolates from raw milk and milk products using PCR and to determine the virulence and the phylogenetic characteristics of the isolates.
Of the 10 virulence genes, lip, exu and ser were the most common genes found in all isolates followed by ast (30%), act (30%), aer (76%) and hly (95%).
Multiplex PCR was used to detect genes encoding for 11 frequently encountered extraintestinal virulence factors (sfa/foc, papC, papGII, papGIII, fyuA, iroN, aer, traT, neuC, hlyC, and cnf1), which belong to the main classes of virulence factors (adhesins, toxins, iron acquisition systems, and protectins) (11).
In addition, there is limited information and experimental evidence of the effects of sub-MICs of antimicrobials on the virulence of E.coli.
The sample size was calculated in line with the overall prevalence of virulence factors13 and confidence interval of 95%.
The conventional PCR technique was used for recognition of virulence genes include (traT and iss).
The bacterial analysis pipeline of GoSeqIt (Denmark) tools was used to annotate and identify known acquired antibiotic-resistant genes via ResFinder, [7] virulence factors using VirulenceFinder [8] and mobile genetic elements through PlasmidFinder.
PCR results of virulence genes confirmed that 66% of strains were carrying the traT gene, 26% the Shiga toxin gene and 16% the intimin (eae) gene, while all strains were negative for aerobactin gene.
The objectives of this study were to investigate beta-lactam resistance, the epidemiologic relationship, serotype distribution, and the prevalence of beta-lactamase genes, namely [bla.sub.TEM], [bla.sub.PER], [bla.sub.CTX-M], [bla.sub.SHV], and the virulence genes of clinical ampicillin-resistant S.