virulence


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Related to virulence: toxigenicity

virulence

 [vir´u-lens]
the degree of pathogenicity of a microorganism as indicated by case fatality rates and/or its ability to invade the tissues of the host; the competence of any infectious agent to produce pathologic effects. adj., adj vir´ulent.

vir·u·lence

(vir'yū-lĕns),
The disease-evoking severity of a pathogen; numerically expressed as the ratio of the number of cases of overt infection to the total number infected, as determined by immunoassay.
[L. virulentia, fr. virulentus, poisonous]

virulence

/vir·u·lence/ (vir´u-lens) the degree of pathogenicity of a microorganism as indicated by the severity of disease produced and the ability to invade the tissues of the host; by extension, the competence of any infectious agent to produce pathologic effects.vir´ulent

virulence

[vir′yələns]
Etymology: L, virulentus, poisonous
the power of a microorganism to produce disease.

virulence

Epidemiology The proportion of persons with clinical disease, who after infection, become severely ill or die. See Neurovirulence.

vir·u·lence

(vir'yū-lĕns)
The disease-evoking power of a pathogen; numerically expressed as the ratio of the number of cases of overt infection to the total number infected, as determined by immunoassay.
[L. virulentia, fr. virulentus, poisonous]

virulence

The capacity of any infective organism to cause disease and to injure or kill a susceptible host.

virulence

the collective properties of an organism that render it pathogenic to another one, the host.

vir·u·lence

(vir'yū-lĕns)
The disease-evoking power of a pathogen.
[L. virulentia, fr. virulentus, poisonous]

virulence

the degree of pathogenicity of a microorganism as indicated by case fatality rates and/or its ability to invade the tissues of the host; the competence of any infectious agent to produce pathological effects.

virulence alteration
References in periodicals archive ?
We detected virulence determinants of motility controlled by flhE, fliN fliL, flgA, fliD, fliC, fliP, flgD, flhA, fliS, flhB, flgK, fliF, flgB, flgJ, flgC, flgL, flgN, flgM, flhC, fliE, fliO, fliH, flgE, fliB, fliA, fliK, fliI, flgF, flgI, fliG, fliR, flgH, flhD, flgG, fliT, fliM, fliZ, and fliQ.
Key words: Enterococcus faecium, biofilm, antibiotic, resistance, virulence
The aim of the present study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of ampicillin resistant enterococci from dogs and cats' rectal swab samples and the occurrence of five virulence determinants in those isolates.
In contrast, this review have discussed the summary of all five Brucella virulence factors which are involved in the pathogenicity and intracellular survivability of bacterium, and evading from host autophagy, innate and adaptive immune responses.
The present study aims to compare the production of these virulence factors between Enterococcus isolated from nosocomial infections and from stool samples, i.
Brucella virulence factor A (bvfA) is a small 11 kDa periplasmic protein unique to the genus Brucella.
Out of an array of virulence factors, haemolysis, gelatinase and biofilm production are the most important ones and easily detectable in a routine diagnostic laboratory because of which these properties have been studied by many researchers.
sup][6] Studies from India on virulence factors expressed by Candida species isolated from VVC subjects are few,[sup][7] therefore this study was taken up with the aim to find out whether the isolated Candida spp.
It has been observed that Listeria monocytogenes employ these virulence factors that act synergistically in the intracellular pathogenicity of the bacteria [8].
All genes that encode for virulence associated factors that allow the pathogen to establish infection in the host are defined as virulence genes.