virucide


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Related to virucide: germicide, viricide, sterilant

virucide

 [vi´rŭ-sīd]
an agent that neutralizes or destroys a virus; see also antiviral.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vi·ru·cide

(vī'rŭ-sīd),
An agent active against virus infections.
Synonym(s): viricide
[virus + L. caedo, to kill]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

virucide

(vī′rə-sīd′)
n.
Variant of viricide.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

vi·ru·cide

(vī'rŭ-sīd)
An agent active against virus infections.
[virus + L. caedo, to kill]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Under this alternative, disinfection of the wastewater effluent will be carried out using ozone, an extremely reactive oxidant and a very effective bactericide and virucide. The liquid oxygen will be transported and stored on the site and will be used as the raw material for ozone generation.
daigremontiana) are reported to exhibit antimicrobial [2, 3] and virucide [4-6] activity.
Henry Schein describes the towelettes as appropriate for use as a virucide and contains 17.2 percent alcohol.
Ideally, a virucide would also be active against other enveloped pathogens.
Properties: NP 4.5 detergent/disinfectant (EPA registration number 1839 79) and NP 4.5 (D&F) detergent/disinfectant (EPA registration number 1839-95) are detergent/disinfectant cleaners with a variety of claims including fungicide, deodorant, sanitizer, mildewstat and virucide. Two new antibiotic-resistant organism claims have recently been added to the NP 4.5 non-phosphate formulations: vancomycin intermediate resistant.
Including Insecticides, Pesticides are grouped as Fungicides, Bactericides, Ovicides, Larvicides, Adulticides, Herbicides, Nematicides, Virucides, Molluscicides etc.
with virucides, gamma rays, formaldehyde, heat, etc.), they can be manipulated in a basic biosafety environment.
Other important potential applications for a public-private alliance in the AIDS arena lie in the development of vaginal microbicides and virucides, which would allow a woman to protect herself from HIV infection without asking her partner to wear a condom.