virtue


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virtue

 [vir´choo]
in bioethics, a trait of character that disposes a person habitually to excellence of intent and performance with respect to the telos proper to life as a human being or to a specific activity or role in life. Some virtues (such as cleanliness) are important socially rather than morally. (See also morality.) Virtues in medicine include trustworthiness, compassion, phronesis, justice, fortitude, temperance, integrity, and self-effacement.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
His definition of virtue as 'the power and desire of attaining things honourable,' like the first definition of justice in the Republic, is taken from a poet.
The problems of virtue and knowledge have been discussed in the Lysis, Laches, Charmides, and Protagoras; the puzzle about knowing and learning has already appeared in the Euthydemus.
The Protagoras arrived at a sort of hypothetical conclusion, that if 'virtue is knowledge, it can be taught.' In the Euthydemus, Socrates himself offered an example of the manner in which the true teacher may draw out the mind of youth; this was in contrast to the quibbling follies of the Sophists.
In the Republic the relation of knowledge to virtue is described in a manner more consistent with modern distinctions.
Socrates reminds Meno that this is only an enumeration of the virtues and not a definition of the notion which is common to them all.
Those conditions, however, which arise from causes which may easily be rendered ineffective or speedily removed, are called, not qualities, but affections: for we are not said to be such virtue of them.
The various kinds of knowledge and of virtue are habits, for knowledge, even when acquired only in a moderate degree, is, it is agreed, abiding in its character and difficult to displace, unless some great mental upheaval takes place, through disease or any such cause.
Orchestra BioMed announced it has formed a global strategic partnership with Terumo Corporation for development and commercialization of Virtue Sirolimus-Eluting Balloon in the percutaneous coronary and peripheral interventions field.
At the Heart of Virtue Growth: 'Self-of-virtue' and 'Virtue identity'*
Austin, Nicholas, SJ, Aquinas on Virtue: A Causal Reading, Washington, DC, Georgetown University Press, 2017; paperback; pp.
The general idea of McGrath's proposal sounds useful to me, but I am a virtue theorist and researcher rather than a character educator or program evaluator.
The book's center of gravity is Aquinas's ostensibly Augustinian definition of virtue (from Lombard's Sentences) in Summa Theologiae III, q.