viral therapy

vi·ral ther·a·py

the use of genetically altered virus particles for delivering genes to specific sites for the purpose of therapy.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vi·ral ther·a·py

(vī'răl thār'ă-pē)
Use of genetically altered virus particles for delivering genes to specific sites for the purpose of therapy.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A report says 2239 HIVpositive people are on HAART (Highly Active Anti-Retro Viral Therapy) treatment and all other 329 people are absconding.
In oncolytic viral therapy, oncolytic viruses infect tumor cells and replicate themselves in tumor cells; upon lysis of infected tumor cells, new virion particles burst out and proceed to infect additional tumor cells.
Women are categories based on CD4 count and are treated with anti-retro viral therapy. (6)
Among these weight is a modifiable factor and obese patients should be advised to lose weight before embarking them on anti viral therapy in order to improve their chances of viral clearance.
Every year, three to four million individuals are newly infected and 40-60 percent of them will develop chronic hepatitis.1 Anti- viral therapy is an important consideration in the management of patients with chronic HCV infection, as a sustained virologic response (SVR) to therapy may halt fibrosis progression, decrease the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, and improve sur vival.2,3
" At the moment, there is no strong anti- viral therapy for this ( Japanese encephalitis) except for a vaccine that the government imports from China," Mahima Datla, the company's senior vice- president, said at the launch here.
Dr Waqar, highlighted the efforts of Sindh government regarding the hepatitis program, and sand that thousands of peoples from Sindh were receiving free Interferon and anti viral therapy from zakat and bait-ul-mal funds.(PR)
VCN will get further financing from Grifols pending successful development of viral therapy candidates.
As a result of these papers, the use of viral therapy gained increasing respect in the treatment of brain cancer.
A $10 million grant from the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR) will enable the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute fund research and development for new therapeutics for cancer patients, including the development of oncolytic viral therapy products.
Harrington (Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK) provides an overview of the current status of viral therapy of cancer, focusing on the biology, selectivity, and clinical applications of viruses that have been used as cancer therapies.