viral load test


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viral load test

Lab medicine A test that measures HIV RNA for prognosis and/or to monitor the efficacy of anti-HIV drug regimens
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Viral load test

A new blood test for monitoring the speed of HIV replication in AIDS patients. The viral load test is based on PCR techniques and supplements the CD4+ cell count tests.
Mentioned in: AIDS Tests
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new technology eases HIV viral load tests, making results available within a matter of minutes.
In terms of clinical characteristics, 86% of AI/AN patients on ART were adherent, 64% had achieved sustained viral suppression, and 76% had achieved viral suppression as of their most recent viral load test in the past 12 months.
Only one of nine persons with a viral load test conducted between 91 days and 1 year post-release had viral suppression.
As pharmaceutical companies continue to focus on the integrase region of the HIV-1 genome, viral load test manufacturers are working to ensure the capability of assays and specifically primer/probe designs to withstand the rapid and constant genomic changes the virus undergoes.
Routine laboratory and clinical data were collected by the ministries of health and CDC personnel from each country's laboratory database on the total number of ART patients, the total number of viral load tests, the number of viral load tests with laboratory-confirmed viral suppression, and the established target number of viral load tests for 2015 and 2016.
The CDC researchers counted the number of HIV-positive people who had (1) at least one CD4 count or viral load test in the past year and (2) two or more CD4 counts or viral load tests at least 3 months apart.
given a viral load test) in order to identify people in primary infection before seroconversion.
Second, the percentage of persons with viral suppression might be overestimated or underestimated and not representative of all persons with HIV in the United States because 1) not all states have implemented routine reporting of CD4 and viral load test results, so estimates of percentages of persons retained in care are based on a limited number of states; 2) MMP data might include persons more likely to be retained in care or adhere to ART; and 3) the estimate assumed no viral suppression among persons not in care, although a small percentage of persons demonstrate viral suppression without taking ART.
Detecting HBV DNA is like detecting HIV RNA with the HIV viral load test. In people with isolated core HBV, the hepatitis virus probably keeps making new copies of itself at a low level.
The investigators also recorded how many antiretroviral-treated people had a viral load above 50 copies on the last viral load test of (he study period.