viral culture


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viral culture

A test in which a specimen–eg, throat swab, sputum, stool, CSF, urine, from a Pt is placed in live cells; various viruses–eg, adenovirus, enterovirus, herpes simplex, measles, mumps, myxovirus, paramyxovirus, rhinovirus, rubella, varicella-zoster, etc can be cultured from clinical specimens, but are not routinely performed as effective therapies are limited. See Shell vial assay.
References in periodicals archive ?
A primary diagnosis of sexually transmitted infection was made but was not further characterized, and no specific treatment was administered pending viral culture results.
Influenza tests were placed into Class I because these products detected antibodies developed in response to an influenza infection, while the detection of the virus was done primarily by viral culture.
These new standards were proposed following publications according to which many of the visual read rapid influenza detection tests had poor sensitivity compared with viral culture and reverse transcription PCR methods.
All CSF specimens were tested by viral culture in C6/36 and BHK21 cells (7) and tested for antibodies against JEV (3,4).
PCR testing and viral culture confirmed infection with the pandemic H1N1 virus.
Twenty-six states and DC (57%) reported their state public health laboratory could rapidly provide testing by orthopoxvirus nonvariola polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and viral culture ([dagger]); 22 (47%) could provide testing by orthopoxvirus PCR assay, 10 (21%) by a variola PCR assay, and seven (15%) by electron microscopy.
ACOG has recognized that HSV PCR is 1.5-4 times more sensitive than viral culture, samples are easier to maintain, and PCR is the test of choice for diagnosis of infections of the CNS.
Viral culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) had a low yield, especially when the specimens weren't taken early in the course of the disease, he said.
Confirmed: case that meets the clinical case definition (i.e., unilateral or bilateral tender, self-limited, swelling of the parotid or other salivary gland, lasting >2 days and without other apparent cause) and is laboratory confirmed (i.e., by a positive IgM test result or positive viral culture) or epidemiologically linked to a confirmed case.
The literature on these assays has been uniformly positive on a performance level, most often surpassing the gold standard of viral culture. The problem has not been the numbers reported from the laboratory, but rather the time it takes to get results.
In 2008, nasal swab specimens from show pigs showed no molecular or viral culture evidence of influenza A virus.
counties over 4 consecutive years, the investigators compared provider-ordered rapid influenza test results with viral culture and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results obtained from children older than 5 years.