violate


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violate

(vī′ĕ-lāt″) [L. violare, to injure]
To harm or injure a person, esp. to rape a female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brady, 430 US 274, 277 (1977), a state tax violates the Commerce Clause if it:
The jury rejected all these arguments, and found Kay and Murphy guilty on 12 counts of violating the FCPA and 1 count of conspiracy to violate the statute.
Simply put, only force that is clearly and plainly something no reasonable police officer could ever do violates the Constitution.
Ball, the Supreme Court -- building on a long line of church-state precedents -- ruled five to four that placing public school teachers in sectarian private schools violates the First Amendment's establishment clause.
As a general rule, if your firm will control a foreign company, ask the directors, officers, employees and agents of the company to acknowledge in writing that they're familiar with the FCPA and will not take actions that would cause you to violate its provisions.
When they found it, they discovered that it permits the existence of particles they call "parafermions" or "parons," which can violate the exclusion principle.
The Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA), the court said, does not violate the First Amendment and must be obeyed.
Supreme Court decided that a police officer's failure to give Miranda warnings, coupled with coercive questioning of a defendant, did not violate the defendant's privilege against self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment.
He explained that the homeowner had only erred in "keep[ing] current [his FOI card], and we chose not to prosecute this memory lapse," since it would "violate the spirit of the law and be a narrow-minded approach." He also said that the decision not to prosecute was made after conferring with Wilmette police.
But courts have often ruled that similar displays don't violate the Constitution when they focus on a nonreligious subject, in this case, the history of law.
Section 10.30(a)(2) would also prohibit practitioners from directly or indirectly making uninvited written or oral solicitations of employment if these solicitations would violate applicable conduct rules or Federal or state law.
Or does removing these books violate students' rights to freedom of speech and ideas?