violate

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violate

(vī′ĕ-lāt″) [L. violare, to injure]
To harm or injure a person, esp. to rape a female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Violability. Constitutivists might, for instance, take normative
They present seven papers exploring to the problems presented by ungrammaticality for the architectural structure of Optimality Theory, which with its focus on outputs and constraint violability is particularly challenged by the phenomenon.
And it's all upholstered in big ideas--about nationalism, cultural identity, the fear of absolute authority, the perceived threat of borders and their violability, and the overpowering irrationality of xenophobia." THOMAS M.
(a) Violability: Constraints are violable, but violation is minimal.
Explicitly, however, Wyclif remains committed to a hierarchical distinction between spiritual and physical realities, in which the physical violability of any sanctuary is far less important than the sins of those it protects.
It has multiple aspects, including the denial of autonomy and subjectivity and the ideas of ownership, fungibility (one is just like the others), and violability (it's all right to break the thing up or abuse it)....
Yet while the precedent Iran was attempting to set--that of the violability of Northern Iraq's borders--was clear enough, whether Turkey will follow suit with its own incursion into the territory remains questionable.
The marks of intimacy depend upon the violability of Goffman's "territories of the self." Without such territory over which you vigilantly patrol the borders there can be nothing special in allowing or gaining access to it ...
To the extent that the supreme law of the land enshrines arguments and attitudes that deny personhood and life to the fetus or unborn child, and which make the determination of personhood a function of the private judgment of individuals, the Court's abortion decisions encourage a belief in the violability of human life.
This contrasts with the concept of "violability," familiar from optimality theory (Prince and Smolensky 1993), where violated constraints simply fail to apply and have no effect upon the output.
Jackson's first published novel, The Road through the Wall (1948), explores the violability of home spaces in a fictional California community.
Thus Diana York Blaine argues that The Crying of Lot 49 shows the failure of meta-narratives and the 'materiality and violability of the body' (p.