vinyl chloride


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Related to vinyl chloride: polyvinyl chloride

vi·nyl chlo·ride

a substance used in the plastics industry and suspected of being a potent carcinogen in humans.
Synonym(s): chloroethylene

vinyl chloride

 Toxicology A monomer that polymerizes to polyvinyl chloride–PVC, which is used in organic chemistry and manufacturing plastics Adverse effects VC is carcinogenic and carries a risk of liver, brain, lung CA, lymphoma, leukemia. See PVC–polyvinyl chloride.

vinyl chloride

CH2=CHCl, a vinyl radical attached to a chlorine atom. It is used commercially to make pipes, tubing, and plastic resin. Some people exposed to vinyl chloride develop hepatic angiosarcoma.
CAS # 75-01-4
See also: vinyl
References in periodicals archive ?
- Learn about opportunities in the Vinyl Chloride Monomer (VCM) industry
Vinyl chloride, a gas used to make plastics, is an acute respiratory irritant that can cause headache, drowsiness, and dizziness.
Hydrogen chloride produced during the gasification process of vinyl chloride is neutralized with lime.
Consumers can recognize some products made of vinyl chloride because they have a ``3'' or a ``v'' next to the triangular recycling symbol.
EPA's conclusion that "the association [between vinyl chloride and cancers other than the liver] is weak and any estimated increase in mortality from cancer at these sites is likely to be less than for liver cancer" (U.S.
For Rosner and Markowitz the story began in 1993, when they traveled to Lake Charles, Louisiana, to look at what they were told was "a warehouse of material" about vinyl chloride and cancer.
PVC facility will produce 2.1 billion lb/yr of chlorine and caustic soda, 1.65 billion lb of vinyl chloride monomer, and 1.3 billion lb of PVC.
The recent Vinyl Chloride ship incident was handled without a new bridge, even though 594 kilograms of monomer were released, according to the "Lloyds List" newspaper.
The company has admitted it vented the carcinogen vinyl chloride into the air and falsified monitoring reports.
Other dangeous chemicals include vinyl chloride for making PVC plastic and ammonia for synthetic fertilizer.
Merchant was instrumental in the development of ethyl vinyl chloride polymers and in the introduction of SMA polymers and polystyrene emulsions in coating and sizing applications.
Besides affecting polymer properties, residual monomers are also often toxic, e.g., vinyl chloride present in the highly versatile thermoplastic poly(vinyl chloride) is known to be a carcinogen, and acrylonitrile is extremely harmful.