villitis

vil·lo·si·tis

(vil'ō-sī'tis),
Inflammation of the chorionic villi surface of the placenta.
Synonym(s): villitis
[villous + G. -itis inflammation]

villitis

coronitis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
17] Placental malaria can produce pathological changes in the placenta, such as thickening of the basement membrane, inflammatory cell infiltrates, villitis and microinfarct owing to clumping of parasitised red blood cells and the occlusion of micro vasculatures.
Villitis of unknown etiology can also be seen in the setting of vascular damage and is commonly associated with stem villous obliteration or foci of avascular villi.
9] The discrete histopathological findings were grouped into 15 main findings and four major pathological patterns for the purpose of statistical analysis: [10] (i) maternal vascular underperfusion (MUP) including non-marginal, recent, and organised infarction involving >10% of parenchyma, agglutination, placental syncytial (ST) knots, intervillous fibrin deposition involving more than 20% of the intervillous space, peri-villous fibrin deposition, villous hypoplasia, intervillous haematoma or retroplacental haematoma; (ii) fetal vascular underperfusion (FUP) including fetal vasculopathy and/or avascular villi; (iii) inflammatory with villitis, chorioamnionitis or vasculitis lesions; (iv) others (stromal fibrosis and calcification).
Features of chronic villitis were detected in 3 of the IUGR placentas and 1 of the control placenta and the difference was not significant (p 0.
We posited that damage to the placenta may occur directly from exposure to circulating particles or secondary to systemic inflammation, either of which may result in any of the well-defined histologic placental chronic inflammatory lesions--chronic villitis (Figure 1), chronic chorioamnionitis, or intervillositis.
Placental tissue from one miscarriage showed heterogeneous chorionic villi with calcification, fibrosis, perivillous fibrin deposition, and patchy intervillositis and focal villitis, while tissue from the other miscarriage had sparsely sampled normal-appearing chorionic villi.
Placental pathology in pregnant women with SLE is characterized by ischemia/hypoxia, decidual vasculopathy, decidual and fetal thrombi, chronic villitis, decreased placental weight and placental infarctions along with deposit of fibrin, immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, immunoglobulin A, and complement 3 in the trophoblastic membrane.
There was no evidence of villitis or intervillositis, and no opportunistic infections (e.
Pathologic examination of the placenta showed no evidence of chorioamnionitis, villitis, or parenchymal abscesses, and placental cultures were sterile.
En el examen microscopico se observaron vellosidades coriales edematizadas, con bordes circinados y patron vascular anomalo, asociado con villitis cronica (figuras 3 y 4).
Additionally, in the blood vessels in the basal plate of placentas from pregnancies with low birth weight and maternal uteroplacental malperfusion evidence reported an increase in TF compared with placentas from pregnancies with low birth weight associated with chronic villitis or normal pregnancies; however, these results correspond to immunohistochemical analysis and p value is not reported (12).
Placenta shows multiple chorionic villi with no villitis or intervillositis.