vigilance

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vig·i·lance

(vij'i-lăns),
An attentiveness, alertness, or watchfulness for whatever may occur.
[L. vigilantia, wakefulness]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vigilance

Neurology The conscious and semiconscious focusing and sustained attention to subtle sensory signals within a determined modality–eg, auditory or visual, coupled to filtering out of distracting internal and external stimuli; PET studies of humans localize the 'attention center' to the prefrontal and superior parietal cortex primarily in the right hemisphere, regardless of the modality or laterality of the stimulus
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

vigilance

(vĭj′ĭ-lăns) [L. vigilantia, wastefulness]
The condition of being attentive, alert, and watchful.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Patient discussion about vigilance

Q. Can I get a headache from watching too much T.V? I've been having headaches after watching more than an hour and a half T.V straight. It also happens If I use the computer the same way.

A. Could be god's way of telling you that you should go out more, play basketball instead of watching basketball. But it's probably short eye sight problem. But it'll do you good going out side instead of playing in your computer!

Q. If diabetes has to do with sugar in the blood why does diabetic patients have to watch their salt consumption?

A. very good question :) and a good answer too:)
if you have Diabetes type 2 that means you have a risk factor for heart attacks. it also means you probably have high blood pressure, so it's in your best interest to watch your sult consumption even more then others.

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References in periodicals archive ?
If Britain's need for vigilence and self-renewal, most usefully manifested in the maintenance at whatever cost of her naval supremacy, was one of the great themes of Kipling's poetry as the century drew to a close there was another one that both commanded attention and fitted neatly, hand in glove, with the first preoccupation.
This suggests that vigilence levels among experienced surveillance operators are lower during daily operations, despite the potentially alerting influence of participation in the study.
New York's first secretary of Indian affairs, Robert Livingston, wrote in May 1701: "Of the Five [Iroquois] Nations, I need not enumerate the advantages arising from their firmness to this government [of New York], they having fought our battles for us and been a constant barrier of defence between Virginia and Maryland and the French, and by their constant vigilence have prevented the French from making any descent that way."(78) In 1754, British commissioners for trade clearly noted that
The project was frustrated because of the UK's vigilence.' On the contrary, the British government had known of the existence of Project Babylon much earlier.
The reason for this vigilence is that in men, the large residual urine may be related to the prostate and ultimately cause hydronephrosis and kidney failure.
He said Tunisia was at a cross-road, appealing for vigilence.
Had it not been for their vigilence, which then and now, is second to none, my mother and father, together with 400-plus other passengers would have been blown up.