vicarious

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Related to vicariousness: excessive amount

vi·car·i·ous

(vī-kar'ē-ŭs),
Acting as a substitute; occurring in an abnormal situation.
[L. vicarius, from vicis, supplying place of]

vicarious

/vi·car·i·ous/ (vi-kar´e-us)
1. acting in the place of another or of something else.
2. occurring at an abnormal site.

vicarious

(vī-kâr′ē-əs, vĭ-)
adj.
1. Experienced or felt by empathy with or imaginary participation in the life of another person: read about mountain climbing and experienced vicarious thrills.
2. Endured or done by one person substituting for another: vicarious punishment.
3. Committed or entrusted to another, as powers or authority; delegated.
4. Physiology Occurring in or performed by a part of the body not normally associated with a certain function.

vi·car′i·ous·ly adv.
vi·car′i·ous·ness n.

vi·car·i·ous

(vī-kar'ē-ŭs)
Acting as a substitute; assumption of function or character of another person or thing.
[L. vicarius, from vicis, supplying place of]
References in periodicals archive ?
Or to continue the "chemical" analogy a little further, a whole set of new reactions are set off that in the longer term (the stress is important) may have a profound effect on the understanding of vicariousness.
It is the varieties of Hilda's vicariousness that make Edward so full of comedy and mischief.
Throughout, the narrator is plagued by vicariousness, life lived by proxy, a condition which seems to stretch back to childhood.
THE CLASH From Here To Eternity (Columbia): They may have epitomised, in their early years at least, the feral vicariousness of punk, the very essence of alienated dole queue rock, but by the end, as this live compilation demonstrates all too clearly, The Clash were just another rock band.
It is time the theology of life for others were rooted in a theology of life for one another, and the idea of vicariousness in the idea of mutual recognition.
13) Perpetua was therefore to acquire honour with a double vicariousness, since she would gain it despite the will of the crowd itself.