vicarious


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vi·car·i·ous

(vī-kar'ē-ŭs),
Acting as a substitute; occurring in an abnormal situation.
[L. vicarius, from vicis, supplying place of]

vicarious

(vī-kâr′ē-əs, vĭ-)
adj.
1. Experienced or felt by empathy with or imaginary participation in the life of another person: read about mountain climbing and experienced vicarious thrills.
2. Endured or done by one person substituting for another: vicarious punishment.
3. Committed or entrusted to another, as powers or authority; delegated.
4. Physiology Occurring in or performed by a part of the body not normally associated with a certain function.

vi·car′i·ous·ly adv.
vi·car′i·ous·ness n.

vi·car·i·ous

(vī-kar'ē-ŭs)
Acting as a substitute; assumption of function or character of another person or thing.
[L. vicarius, from vicis, supplying place of]
References in periodicals archive ?
VR is embedded in resilience theory as the vicarious learning process which allows for the impact of clients whose positive adaptation stems from their ability to cope with adversity.
The vicarious impact of trauma survivors' stories and experiences on trauma therapists
Researchers have demonstrated how exposure to client trauma impacts the development of vicarious traumatization and how one's level of wellness provides a layer of protection against impairment (Lawson & Myers, 2011; Williams et al., 2012) but have not examined wellness along with exposure to client trauma experiences in the context of vicarious traumatization.
Zygmunt Bauman acerbically criticized the notion of hereditary or vicarious victimhood as "basking in the fame of [one's] ancestral martyrs without paying the price of the glory" and thus "living on a borrowed identity--as martyrs by appointment, martyrs who never suffered" (34).
This can be seen as an insurance policy taken out against vicarious trauma and burnout.
The concept of vicarious experience refers to the knowledge that multinational enterprises (MNEs) obtain from the actions of other companies that share a common characteristic (Jiang et al.
This vicarious trauma, also referred to as compassion fatigue or secondary traumatic stress, refers to the negative reactions that can occur when professionals repeatedly witness or hear about victims' difficult experiences of trauma, violence, and abuse.
Vicarious Trauma and Disaster Mental Health: Understanding Risks and Promoting Resilience
Broader Application of ESA Vicarious Liability Resulting in
While secondary traumatic stress refers to the experiencing of PTSD-like symptoms among individuals exposed to the trauma narratives of others, vicarious trauma (VT) incorporates the pervasive and cumulative effects of indirect exposure to trauma over time, which often entails long-term modifications to an individual's way of experiencing themselves, others, and the world (Pearlman & Saakvitne, 1995; Trippany, White, & Wilcoxon, 2004).
Stellvertretung or vicarious representation (sometimes translated, less adequately, as "representation" or "substitution") stands at the heart of Joseph Ratzinger's theology.
Thus, Bandura [10] suggested that four categories of experience or influential factor that are used in the development of self-efficacy: mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and physiological arousal.