vibrissae


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Related to vibrissae: whiskers

vibrissae

(vī-brĭs′ē) vibrissa [L. vibrissa, that which shakes]
Stiff hairs within the nostrils at the anterior nares.

vibrissae (vī·briˑ·sā),

n pl the thick hairs which grow inside the nostrils to help keep large particles from entering the nasal passages.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vibrissae present in TI and TII, generally in the form of very thick and very dense bristles (Fig.
19) Results of his and Jacquin's groups stated that trigeminal primary afferents associated with mystacial vibrissae are not predictors of differences in central morphology.
The vibrissae, however, were white, not black, as typically seen (Fig.
The onset of recovery for both vibrissae orientation and eye blink reflex occurred within a few days.
The moderate length and thickness of its vibrissae suggest that the animal did not have semiaquatic or arboreal habits, because semiaquatic rodents have relatively short and bristly vibrissae while arboreal rodents have long and thin vibrissae.
Vibrissae (vih-brihs-ah) Cats' whiskers; the long stiff hairs near the muzzle.
si:) C C--the letter C CE cedar, ceanothus, ibices, panacea, circe CEE ceefax, dicees, proceed, seducee CEY ceylonite (a ferruginous variety of spinel from Ceylon) CIE cieling, abcie CY cypres (in Law, means 'as near as practicable') SAO Saorstat eirann (Irish Free State) SEA season, heartsease, Chelsea SEI seiff (old type of eye-wash), casein, disseisee SI sikh, arsine, Farsi SSAE thalassemia, vibrissae SSEE lesseeship, assessee SSI assize (parallel beds of rock agreeing in their organic remains) SY Sylow (P.
It is rare because of the protection provided by the ciliary action of the nasal mucosa and the nasal vibrissae and by the bactericidal properties of nasal secretions?
A cat's whiskers are called vibrissae and it has four of them, which it uses to determine if a space is too small to squeeze through.
The vibrissae can detect the slightest movement of the sand within a radius greater than the length of its body, including the head.
A] under stress only apply to morphological traits that are normally highly canalized, such as wing venation patterns in Drosophila and vibrissae number in mice (see Hoffmann and Parsons 1997).
Edwards (1946) accurately described neonate Mexican ground squirrels as pink, blind, hairless, and marked by vibrissae and comparatively well-developed forelimbs.