vibration

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vibration

 [vi-bra´shun]
1. a rapid movement to and fro; oscillation.
2. the shaking of the body as a therapeutic measure.
3. a form of massage.
4. a technique of chest physical therapy whereby pressure and a shaking movement of the hand are applied to various segments of the lungs to mobilize secretions.

vi·bra·tion

(vī-brā'shŭn),
1. A shaking.
2. A to-and-fro movement, as in oscillation.
[L. vibratio, fr. vibro, pp. -atus, to quiver, shake]

vibration

/vi·bra·tion/ (vi-bra´shun)
1. a rapid movement to and fro.
2. massage with a light, rhythmic, quivering motion; often performed with a mechanical device (electrovibratory massage).

vibration

[vībrā′shən]
Etymology: L, vibrare, to vibrate
a type of massage administered by quickly tapping with the fingertips or alternating the fingers in a rhythmic manner or by a mechanical device. See also massage.

vibration

Massage
A “soft tissue” technique used in massage therapy that uses vibrating movements, usually delivered by an electrical device.

vibration

Vox populi Jittering, oscillation, grinding

vi·bra·tion

(vī-brā'shŭn)
A group of movements in massage that involve fine or coarse rhythmic shaking of various structures, with or without compression or traction.
[L. vibratio, fr. vibro, pp. -atus, to quiver, shake]

Vibration

The purpose of vibration is to help break up lung secretions. Vibration can be either mechanical or manual. It is performed as the patient breathes deeply. When done manually, the person performing the vibration places his or her hands against the patient's chest and creates vibrations by quickly contracting and relaxing arm and shoulder muscles while the patient exhales. The procedure is repeated several times each day for about five exhalations.

vibration,

n massage technique believed to enhance nerve function by using small superficial rapid movements of the fingertips or palm.

vibration

1. a rapid movement to and fro; oscillation.
2. the shaking of the body as a therapeutic measure.
3. a form of massage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ground-borne vibrations induced by road transport is common source of environmental problem for residents living near roads where large flow of vehicles is.
The influence of vibrations on vehicle occupant fatigue, Internoise Conference, vol.
When the signals reach the actuator, actual vibrations are performed by the device.
Not only does it support the engine, it also absorbs the vibrations generated by the engine, reducing vibrations of the vehicle frame and vibrations felt inside the vehicle.
Doing exactly what it says on the tin, it detects vibrations using an Android device's inbuilt accelerometer, transforming your phone into a powerful vibration meter tool.
The application of vibrations at the micro-drilling, especially for deep holes, presents a possible progress in solving those issues to increase the reliability of micro drilling processes.
Although, it is unavoidable and inherent in certain machines, a majority of the machines are designed to function absent of any vibrations.
Much equipment used in nanotech, physical and biological sciences can't function properly if subjected to vibrations that exceed small threshold values.
Vibrations have not traditionally been recognized as major health and safety hazards in workplaces, but Laurentian University's Tammy Eger and her colleagues hope to change that perception.
The reduction of deleterious vibrations in the machine-tool-workpiece system is based on the excitation of a particular higher vibration mode of a tool, which leads to through intensification of internal energy dissipation in the tool material.
1998) investigated the vibrations of functionally graded material cylindrical shells, made up of FG material composed of stainless steel and nickel.
Among his topics are the basics of vibration, simple analytic examples, piping vibration, very low cycle vibrations and other phenomena, and a short history of vibration.