veto

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veto

A legislative nyet
References in periodicals archive ?
Vetoed P95.3 (billion) for being not part of the president's projects," Medialdea said in a text message.
"Because the governor's item veto power is limited to 'items of appropriation,' the principal debate is over the meaning of that term and whether the provisions purportedly vetoed by the governor are 'items of appropriation.' "
The veto message, together with the vetoed bill, is printed as a House document.
Casting aside policy significance of the bills momentarily to examine aggregate results, private-to-public threats were somewhat more likely to result in passed bills and vetoed bills.
On Thursday night, Panelo confirmed in a text message that Duterte vetoed the bill.
Abbott also vetoed $1 million allocated to the state Water Development Board to award grants to private projects aimed at water conservation education, the same amount the board was awarded for the initiative last legislative session.
In these cases in which the bill is part of a chain of previously vetoed bills, a president will be more likely to issue a threat.
'Vetoed,' Panelo briefly responded in a text message earlier when asked about the status of the bill.
President Duterte has vetoed two proposed laws that would have created a trust fund for coconut farmers and the coconut industry, citing these might violate the country's 1987 Constitution.
One of the provisions Duterte vetoed is the "Monitoring Expenses of Board Members" of the Movie and Television Review and Classification Board (MTRCB).
It says, in effect, that the governor vetoed items in the budget that he doesn't have the power to veto, an assertion Parks sourced back to Abbott himself.
In Document VIII of the Committee of Detail (a committee of five convened to hammer out constitutional language at the Constitutional Convention), the first language of what became the pocket veto clause called for no pocket veto at all; rather, it called for legislation that could not be vetoed and returned to the house of origin in circumstances in which "their adjournment, prevent its Return" to instead "be returned on the first Day of the next Meeting of the Legislature" (Farrand 1966, II, 162).