vestige


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vestige

 [ves´tij]
the remnant of a structure that functioned in a previous stage of species or individual development. adj., adj vestig´ial.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ves·tige

(ves'tij), [TA]
A trace or a rudimentary structure; the degenerated remains of any structure which occurs as an entity in the embryo or fetus.
Synonym(s): vestigium [TA]
[L. vestigium]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vestige

(vĕs′tĭj)
n.
1. A visible trace, evidence, or sign of something that once existed but exists or appears no more: a building that is the area's last vestige of its colonial era.
2. Biology A rudimentary or degenerate, usually nonfunctioning, structure that is the remnant of an organ or part that was fully developed or functioning in a preceding generation or an earlier stage of development.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ves·tige

(ves'tij) [TA]
A trace or a rudimentary structure; the degenerated remains of any structure that occurs as an entity in the embryo or fetus.
[L. vestigium]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

vestige

A body structure with no current apparent function which appears to have had a function at a previous evolutionary stage.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Vestige, located in a small house in the city's busy downtown, is small, with maximum seating for around 30, and a staff of six, including the owners.
The style of products in the Vestige suite appeals to today's consumers because of its timeless look and meticulous attention to detail.
The gate vestige could not extend above the top surface, because a specific volume of hydraulic fluid has to be maintained within the ABS cylinder, and this is partly controlled by the height of the piston.
After the fire imagery of her first volume, Exercices d'incendie (1994), Sandra Moussempes turns her attention to water: seas, wells, rivers, and bathtubs in Vestiges de fillette.
Standard single-drop nozzles in three styles: Type-1 nozzles used where gate vestige is critical to appearance, or to minimize stringing or drooling; Type-2 nozzles for viscous materials when gate vestige is not critical, or when gating into a runner; and Type-3 valve gate nozzles for highly cosmetic gates, or when higher flow rates are needed.
A similar nostalgia for the local informs his early praise for the regionalist poetry of Edgar Lee Masters and Robert Frost, and it extends into his admiration for Mussolini's program of autarchia, designed (in theory, at least) to empower regional self-rule, a vestige of II Duce's (and Pea's) anarcho-syndicalist beginnings.
The Peace Corps seemed like a vestige of what Americans are supposed to be as opposed to what the rest of the world thinks Americans are.
Some members of the judiciary are completely out of touch with the majority of the British public and appear to leave any vestige of common sense on the courtroom steps.
But there was also a complicated interplay between self-regulation and a stubborn determination to retain a vestige of social autonomy.
It is his contention that in the beginning there was chaos and that, "God creates not by destroying chaos, but by ordering it, by pushing back chaos in three separations (Gen.1:2-10)." He understands chaos to be symbolized by "sea." He reflects that the last vestige of chaos will be abolished on the last day: "I saw a new heaven and a new earth ...
The book leaves the reader without even a vestige of faith in the humanity of modern animal husbandry.
This cold runner system provides valve gating for clean shutoffs with no spree or vestige left on the part, according to the manufacturer.