vestibular vertigo


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Related to vestibular vertigo: Balance problems, Vestibular disorder

vertigo

 [ver´tĭ-go]
a sensation of rotation or movement of one's self (subjective vertigo) or of one's surroundings (objective vertigo) in any plane. The term is sometimes used erroneously as a synonym for dizziness. Vertigo may result from diseases of the inner ear or may be due to disturbances of the vestibular centers or pathways in the central nervous system.
benign paroxysmal positional vertigo recurrent vertigo and nystagmus occurring when the head is placed in certain positions, usually not associated with lesions of the central nervous system.
benign positional vertigo (benign postural vertigo) benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
central vertigo that due to disorder of the central nervous system.
cerebral vertigo vertigo resulting from a brain lesion, such as in meningogenic labyrinthitis. Called also organic vertigo.
disabling positional vertigo constant vertigo or dysequilibrium and nausea in the upright position, without hearing disturbance or loss of vestibular function.
labyrinthine vertigo Meniere's disease.
organic vertigo cerebral vertigo.
peripheral vertigo vestibular vertigo.
positional vertigo that associated with a specific position of the head in space or with changes in position of the head in space.
vestibular vertigo vertigo due to disturbances of the vestibular centers or pathways in the central nervous system.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

vestibular vertigo

Vertigo due to disease or malfunction of the vestibular apparatus.
See also: vertigo
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Oral betahistine is approved for the treatment of Meniere's disease and vestibular vertigo and marketed in more than 80 countries worldwide.
In a nationally representative sample of 4869 adults in Germany, aged 18 to 79 years, the one-year prevalence of moderate to severe dizziness (including vestibular and nonvestibular vertigo) was 22.9% and the one-year prevalence of moderate to severe vestibular vertigo was 4.9% [1].
Vestibular neuritis (VN) is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo (the first being Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo) and is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss.