migraine-associated vertigo

(redirected from vestibular migraine)

migraine-associated vertigo

An idiopathic condition characterised by dizziness and/or recurrent vertigo (DRV) linked to migraines, and which is one the most common causes of chronic DRV. It is more common in females (1.5–5:1 ratio) and is more common in families. Many patients do not have headaches, or have chronic nonspecific headaches that do not fit into the International Headache Society’s migraine classification. Atypical Meniere's disease is now regarded as a migrainous vertigo syndrome.

Cllinical findings
Chronic dizziness and dysequilibrium, episodic rotational vertigo, chronic daily headaches, migraine headaches, light sensitivity, poor visual acuity and other changes in vision, visual "snow", nausea and severe motion intolerance. Because many of the symptoms cannot be objectively tested, physical and neurologic examinations and neuroimaging are often normal.

DiffDx
Meniere's disease, vestibular neuritis, psychiatric disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patients who had central-type vertigo, PBBV, and vestibular migraine were excluded from the study.
Such cases were referred to ENT Department to evaluate for vestibular migraine.
These diagnoses were reached on the basis of (a) absence of typical paroxysmal positional nystagmus indicative of canalolithiasis, presence of persistent positional nystagmus and positional vertigo during an examination performed on a symptomatic day; (b) no history of previous recurrent BPV to imply cupulolithiasis; (c) history, examination findings and vestibular function tests indicative of an alternate cause for positional vertigo such as vestibular migraine (VM), endolymphatic hydrops, vestibular schwannoma, unilateral or bilateral vestibulopathy.
Since the initial report describing the association between migraine and vertigo [1], a number of studies over the last three decades have shown vestibular migraine (VM) to be a common cause of repeated episodic vertigo.
Symptoms of Meniere's disease and vestibular migraine can overlap.
The different causes of acute vertigo and their management are considered in detail, including benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, cerebellar stroke, vestibular migraine and Meniere's disease.
24] Honaker et al reported a patient who had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular migraine and chronic subjective dizziness with severe health anxiety.
Topics include anatomy and embryology of the vestibular apparatus, rotary chair testing, gait analysis, vestibular migraine, structural lesions of the central nervous system, vestibular rehabilitation, and current and future research and challenges.
Differential diagnosis of vertigo Peripheral Central Common Common * BPPV * Phobic postural vertigo * Vestibular neuritis * Vestibular migraine * Meniere's disease * Pathological forms of nystagmus, e.
Vestibular migraine (vertigo accompanied by headache and motion sickness).
Obtaining a family history is critical in patients with vestibular migraine.