vesicular transport


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trans·cy·to·sis

(tranz'sī-tō'sis),
A mechanism for transcellular transport in which a cell encloses extracellular material in an invagination of the cell membrane to form a vesicle (endocytosis), then moves the vesicle across the cell to eject the material through the opposite cell membrane by the reverse process (exocytosis). The transport mechanism by which most proteins reach the Golgi apparatus or the plasma membrane; the vesicles targeted toward lysosomes and secretory storage granules appear to be coated with clathrin.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vesicular transport

n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

trans·cy·to·sis

(tranz-sī-tō'sis)
A mechanism for transcellular transport in which a cell encloses extracellular material in an invagination of the cell membrane to form a vesicle (endocytosis), then moves the vesicle across the cell to eject the material through the opposite cell membrane by the reverse process (exocytosis).
Synonym(s): vesicular transport.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Oppositely, the efflux of sterol from ERC to the PM is inhibited significantly by the energy poisons [28] indicating that vesicular transport out of, but not into, the ERC is a major contributor to sterol transport kinetics.
These physiological events include ion currents and vesicular transport. Endogenous transport vesicles move in the axon for up to six hours after dissection.
This feature is typical of all Coronaviridae viruses that bud intracellularly at membranes of the intermediate compartment between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex, whereas newly assembled virions reach the cell surface by vesicular transport (16).