vertebrate


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vertebrate

 [ver´tĕ-brāt]
1. having a vertebral column.
2. an animal with a vertebral column; any member of the Vertebrata.

ver·te·brate

(ver'tĕ-brāt),
1. Having a vertebral column.
2. An animal having vertebrae.

vertebrate

(vûr′tə-brĭt, -brāt′)
adj.
1. Having a backbone or spinal column.
2. Of or characteristic of vertebrates or a vertebrate.
n.
Any of numerous chordate animals of the subphylum Vertebrata, characterized by a segmented spinal column and a distinct well-differentiated head. The vertebrates include the fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.

ver·te·brate

(vĕr'tĕ-brăt)
1. Having a vertebral column.
2. An animal having vertebrae.

vertebrate

any member of the subphylum Vertebrata (= Craniata) in the phylum Chordata, including all those organisms that possess a backbone, such as fish, amphibia, reptiles, birds and mammals. In addition, they are characterized by having a skull which surrounds a well-developed brain and a bony or cartilaginous skeleton.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Qilinyu rostrata, a 423-million-year-old armored fish, had a jaw that resembles those of modern bony fish and land vertebrates.
Vertebrate biostratigraphy of the Ludlovian Hemse Beds of Gotland, Sweden.
Percentages of vertebrate classes captured during a 2010-2011 small vertebrate trapping study at Lake Laurel area, Baldwin Co., Georgia.
Recently a second type of vertebrate receptor diversification system has been identified in the lamprey and hagfish (Pancer et al., 2004).
First, this revised version of a traditional vertebrate dissection lab requires students to think more critically during the dissection process.
Miocene formations and vertebrate biostratigraphic units, Texas coastal plain.
The octopus and the vertebrate common ancestor occurred about 750 million years ago.
The effect of vector feeding on vertebrate infections by VEEV has not been studied.
(2) In the primitive jawed vertebrate, the remaining gill arches (i.e., the mandibular, hyoid, and fourth and fifth true branchial arches) surround the pharynx in the ventral part of the head.
He is presently professor emeritus of Geological Sciences and curator emeritus of Vertebrate Paleontology at Michigan State University.
But Story is working with scientists at the University of Wollongong who have established techniques for determining cholinesterase levels in vertebrate blood and tissue samples.
INTRODUCTION The purpose of this study was to inventory the occurrence of vertebrate, invertebrate and plant specimens within the basal Fort Union Formation and to plot these occurrences relative to the Hell Creek/Fort Union formation contact.