vernacular

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vernacular

(vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This profit-predicated-on-security equation puts armies, agencies, and organizations into motion, justifying the enormous amount of resources being poured into secure space, or what is vernacularly referred to as 'recovering governability' in the Maya Biosphere.
Successful photoshopping involves tapping into a complex web of vernacularly created generic expectations; successfully analyzing photoshopping involves "focusing on the community processes that create, maintain, and re-create these expectations" (Howard, 2008a, p.
And, perhaps, this is precisely such behavior that other people would vernacularly call stupid.
To which an observer might respond vernacularly: Give me a break.
At its root is a notion of causality as laid down by Isaac Newton: that of an action causing a reaction or, more vernacularly, cause and effect.