vernacular

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vernacular

(vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is helpful to keep in mind Nicholas Watson's arguments against three problematic presumptions often found in vernacular studies: that language politics are always binary, that Latin is inherently the language of cultural authority, and that vernacularization is inherently progressive: "Introduction: King Solomon's Tablets," in The Vulgar Tongue: Medieval and Postmedieval Vernacularity, ed.
Rooted in the democratizing effect of the printing press, these books created new communities of Jewish readers and, moreover, new notions of what it meant to read as a Jew, defined by Jewish vernacularity.
Broader issues are suggested but not comprehensively tackled, such as the problematic meanings of vernacularity in Middle English psalm texts, or the possible links between lay devotional literacy and the cultural penetration of the Psalms.
There has long since been no vernacularity. What and how we are producing and experiencing here finds its conditions there, in Other places, and vice versa.
(129) In his extensive study of the text, Christoph Anderl observed that the text, although written in a vernacular vein, is so difficult and inaccessible in its style that it would be unjustified to argue that the choice of vernacular writing stemmed from a desire to reach a broader audience; rather, the text's vernacularity is in itself a particular literary style.
(26) On that basis, associating "miscellaneity" and "vernacularity" attends to only 15 percent of the available relevant archive.
I conclude by considering the implications of how vernacularity is constructed in these discourses and suggesting that the complex dynamics of photoshopping merit further attention from both new media and communication scholars.
Any given situation that engages vernacularity raises questions about what might be appropriated, who reserves or acquires agency, and how individual and collective identity is negotiated.
Although much of this Latin material was deleted from the second 1570 edition, testifying to what King terms "the progressive vernacularity of the Book of Martyrs" (118), the work continued to grow, swollen by antipapal argument and invective whose inclusion struck a nationalistic chord with Foxe's English readership.
The text balances on the edge of vernacularity itself, and if we begin with an evocation of the very emblem of the lyric voice, we end then with the narrator's refusal to continue in that voice.
The Hindi cosmopolitanism was thus envisioned as a "vernacularity" embedded in the judiciously revived remains of a premodern and largely Sanskrit literary culture, and a vernacular medium explicitly not-English, not-Urdu, and not-Bengali, which would speak for all of India on the international stage.
The Vulgar Tongue: Medieval and Postmedieval Vernacularity. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2003.