vernacular

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vernacular

(vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A reappraisal of Lunuganga that is sensitive to such ethnically striated vernacularism necessitates a rereading of the (Buddhist) temple located beyond the estate as integral to Bawa's landscape composition, such that in the cultural idiom I am evoking it becomes the key to the creation of the space's special 'atmosphere'.
First, I will sketch Stainton's argument against vernacularism. From this sketch I will identify the premise I will later challenge: that propositions conveyed sub-sententially cannot get their logical form derivatively from the sub-sentential speech act itself, because this kind of acts lack the proper syntactic structure to have logical form.
The next chapter examines imperial vernacularism in the post-French Revolution period when there was a renewed attempt to extend European imperial influence in Madagascar.
Chapter 2, "From Fault to Figure," further explores the perils of English vernacularism, focusing in particular on Nicholas Udall's Ralph Roister Doister, a play originally composed in the early 1550s for Udall's grammar school students.
The volume seems to have been a preview of the demotion of vernacularism in the Vernacular Architecture Forum.
The discussion of the vernacularism "snaphanus" touched upon the question of Erasmus' vocabulary.