vernacular


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Related to vernacular: Vernacular architecture

vernacular

(vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
A survey by research firm Vase.ai commissioned by online portal Malaysiakini found that 51 per cent of respondents were in favour of single-stream schools, while the remaining 49 per cent preferred vernacular schools.
Bengaluru (Karnataka) [India] July 30 (ANI/BusinessWire India): There are two different internet user segments in India - the English speaking India (10 per cent of the population), and the vernacular Bharat (90 per cent of the population).
If value is then determined by the listener, vernacular music should likely be labeled with more complimentary descriptions since there is solid evidence that the general population chooses to engage more with vernacular music than with art music--record sales and ticket sales easily support this statement.
Neo-Latin and the Vernaculars: Bilingual Interactions in the Early Modern Period
Vernacular media can relay the same information in a language locals understand and the farmers can respond in good time.The weatherman, too, can share forecasts with the vernacular stations so that farmers can make informed decisions on when to plant and the best seeds to plant based on the anticipated amount of rainfall.
Ilocano magazine Bannawag, the weekly vernacular magazine circulated in the Ilocos region, was established by Liwayway Publishing Inc.
May draws on American film theorist Miriam Hansen--who suggests that Hollywood films created and disseminated a 'vernacular modernism'--to explore the Australian cinematic vernacular about formal education.
The company also runs 14 radio stations, among them two national and 12 vernacular services.
Sobecki, Sebastian, Unwritten Verities: The Making of England's Vernacular Legal Culture, 1463-1549, Notre Dame, University of Notre Dame Press, 2015; paperback; pp.
The first movement of Vita Nuova was influenced by Guido Cavalcante, who, incidentally, urged Dante to write in the Italian vernacular rather than in Latin.
* Dynamics of Neo-Latin and the Vernacular: Language and Poetics, Translation and Transfer.
Vernacular roofs in Iran that were built around 200 years ago, served more than shelter.