vernacular


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Related to vernacular: Vernacular architecture

vernacular

(vər-năk′yə-lər)
n.
1.
a. The everyday language spoken by a people as distinguished from the literary language.
b. A variety of such everyday language specific to a social group or region: the vernaculars of New York City.
2. The specialized vocabulary of a particular trade, profession, or group: in the legal vernacular.
3. The common, nonscientific name of a plant or animal.
adj.
1. Native to or commonly spoken by the members of a particular country or region.
2. Using the native language of a region, especially as distinct from the literary language: a vernacular poet.
3. Relating to or expressed in the native language or dialect.
4. Of or being an indigenous building style using local materials and traditional methods of construction and ornament, especially as distinguished from academic or historical architectural styles.
5. Occurring or existing in a particular locality; endemic: a vernacular disease.
6. Relating to or designating the common, nonscientific name of a biological species.

ver·nac′u·lar·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glossing the Psalms: The Emergence of the Written Vernaculars in Western Europe From the Seventh to the Twelfth Centuries
The book is organised into ten concise chapters, each of which, aside from the Introduction and Conclusion, focuses on the dominant ideas expressed by the cinematic vernacular in a particular time period.
The company also runs 14 radio stations, among them two national and 12 vernacular services.
Sobecki challenges the traditional view that the crystallisation of England's vernacular legal culture occurred during the period 1550 to 1600 as part of a movement towards vernacularism that occurred in the wake of the Reformation.
22) This clearly illustrates that Dante now considers himself to be a benefactor to the less fortunate "sheep," and, as we will see shortly, also a benefactor to an Italian vernacular.
The volume editor begins the section with a study of Dutch occasional poetry from the years 1635 to 1640 that shows how dangerous it is to try to construct larger generalizations from the interaction between Neo-Latin and the vernacular poetic repertoires in this specific area.
Most of VRB in central Iran were located in villages [10] and half of them were constructed based on the vernacular architecture principles.
This marvelous study of the formation of English eloquence in the sixteenth century shows just how misleading this familiar phrase can be: much of the vernacular literature produced in this fertile period of poetic innovation was not noticeably eloquent, nor was it precisely English.
I'm not writing it on period speech just because there's no actual recording of what that vernacular sounded like with intonation and everything.
Why was such a serious image reimagined at the vernacular level as a medium for digital politics and play?
African American, Creole, and other vernacular Englishes in education; a bibliographic resource.
Alison Cornish, Vernacular Translation in Dante's Italy: Illiterate Literature.