re-sit

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re-sit

verb To take an examination a second (or more) time.
References in periodicals archive ?
In another study, Herrera and Cuetos (43) investigated the effect of dopaminergic treatment on action and non- action verb naming in patients with PD.
Participants were given three tasks; naming objects that they saw on the screen, producing a verb that could be used with the object they saw, and imagining the action in their minds.
The paper is structured as follows: Percolation principle explained, briefs on the Igbo verb compound, previous verb-suffix distinctions, the Percolation principle explanation and then summary and conclusion.
The syntactic features could mean the category features such as noun, verb, adjective, etc or other relations necessary in explaining the syntactic structure of the construction while the diacritic features "include those relevant to the particulars of inflection and derivational morphology.
As it is with the pronoun I, the verb-form that goes with this pronoun is go when the verb is in its everyday form.
As claimed by Robert Hinderling (1967), Elmar Seebold (1970) and others, the strong verb is the starting point of lexical derivation in this analysis, which excludes the formation of strong verbs from categories different from the strong verb itself.
The objective of the study is to identify the patterns of verbs and describe their functions in the introduction sections of PhD dissertations in the field of English studies in Pakistan.
As is the case with growl, the verb bawl is primarily used to refer to a sound made by animals--"1.
However, the mere fact that I do not know any verb does not necessarily prejudice its existence.
Kemmer (1993: 16-21) characterizes particular groups of middle verbs which are frequently equipped with specific morphology in languages of the world and considers middle verb clauses as a transitory link between fully elaborated transitive event structures with articulated agentive participants (typically accompanied by patient participants) and typical mono-argumental intransitives with a non-affected subject argument.